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web development rate questions

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by shyaway, Feb 11, 2004.

  1. shyaway

    shyaway IncGamers Member

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    web development rate questions

    pay rate that is...

    for a basic website, how much per hr rate?
    for flash site, how much per hr?
    for e-com (server stuff) ?

    and anything else u can think of?

    p.s. hi everyone, long time no see...
     
  2. Acehigh11

    Acehigh11 IncGamers Member

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    I've usually done basic websites for a flat rate of $30/hour unless somebody has a HUGE project and that rate blows up to a huge sum. Usually when you throw out an estimate of $400 - $600 bucks, people are pretty damn happy, as are you.

    Never done flash, so I can't throw out a quote.

    For e-commerce, we're talking database design, script implementation and Verisign/Paypal hooks, it's some decent dough. Since I do all my freelance stuff in my free time besides my job, plus have 4 years of hardcore e-com experience, I would say my free time is valued around $50 - $60 an hour. But with my background I can implement it right and fast the first/second time so that bumps the rate up a little. Drop it down if you are going to need to play with it for a while and learn how things work, otherwise you will have some high expectations from your client to get the job done right, and fast.

    So things to consider are your experience in the area your customers want you to tackle. Remember that lower prices reel them in fast because of bloated consultant prices and they will beg for more in the future. Also take into account what your needs are, and how badly you need a project for revenue.

    Just some thoughts, take them or leave them. Feel free to ask me to elaborate if you want. :)
     
  3. shyaway

    shyaway IncGamers Member

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    it's a job offer at a friend's workplace
    he doesn't know details about it neither

    his company using macromedia dreamweaver to develop the sites, as he said
    ... or expect to be using it

    so, possibly, some flash might be involved

    the current site doesn't have any flash, just some static pages

    i dont know if they'll want some e-com developed

    i don't wanna go in and give them a price that's either too low, or too high

    and i am no verteran neither as i never got the chance

    so, i will have a talk to them and then give them a quote on how long and how much... which i have next to no clue about

    thanks for reply, it'd be nice if u can mention more about your pricing and such :)

    oh yeah... altho i haven't done stuff commercially, i've my share to experimenting with applications and know at least their basics... and i am currently working on .NET stuff... so much to learn, so little time...
     
  4. Crogon

    Crogon IncGamers Member

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    What I usually do with a job like that is first of all, find out what they would like. Custom artwork? flash interface? extensive website (20+ pages)? e-commerce? then draw up a flatrate to finish off each of those chunks, and add them all up. Then add in a rate for doing work after the site is initially set-up the way they have out-lined it. figure about 20 hrs for a bunch of custom artwork, same for flash. If they want a huge website, make damn sure SOMEBODY knows what info they want on it, that can turn into a fricken nightmare. :p e-commerce is usally easiest to set up a shopping cart somewhere, rather than host your own. if you host your own, you'll need to have a full time internet server specialist to stay on top of the security issues. So.. once you have all that put together, give them an hourly rate for everything that needs to be done after that. for a huge commercial website anything under about $4000 is fair game. the lower your quote, the better chance you have of getting the job though. ;) your best bet is to make the quote as low as possible without short-changing yourself. good luck!
     

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