Latest Diablo 3 News
DiabloWiki Updates
Support the site! Become a Diablo: IncGamers PAL - Remove ads and more!

We have this puppy...

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by HockeyChic, Aug 28, 2006.

  1. HockeyChic

    HockeyChic Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2006
    Messages:
    3,855
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    0
    We have this puppy...

    who is making me crazy!!!! She is a nearly 6 month old bullmastiff. She has recently decided that it's acceptable to put her face on the dining table to grab a piece of cake when no-one is looking. We were told by the breeder that bullmastiffs are very sensitive to the tone of your voice; all we would need to do is speak in a stern voice and she would know not to do things. It is not working!!!!! She jumped over the back of the couch yesterday, clearing the table behind it while in pursuit of the cat. Any advice on making her listen?????? Please? Anybody?
     
  2. Kiba

    Kiba IncGamers Member

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2005
    Messages:
    4,725
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    467
    Maybe try some obidience dog training classes if you wanna spend the money and time too train her.
     
  3. Amra

    Amra IncGamers Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2003
    Messages:
    7,255
    Likes Received:
    15
    Trophy Points:
    472
    I don't have any experience with that breed. But she is still a pup. It sounds like you just need to spend a lot of time with her.

    Nice visual there though.
     
  4. Sir EvilFreeSmeg

    Sir EvilFreeSmeg Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2005
    Messages:
    15,434
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    That breed responds well to an alpha male or female. Normally a firm voice is enough but you may have to thump his nose on occasion. This sounds like one of those occasions. The old rolled-up newspaper is a tried and true method.
     
  5. Amra

    Amra IncGamers Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2003
    Messages:
    7,255
    Likes Received:
    15
    Trophy Points:
    472
    Biting on the cheek or neck works well too.
     
  6. Mew

    Mew Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've taken care of dogs for most of my life, you can do one of three things.

    1: Nip them on the ear and growl at them when they disobey you.

    2: Put two knuckles together and pinch their tail when they disobey you.

    3: Water also works, but not as well as using a harsh voice and shunning them.

    Eventually they will learn not to do things like that and will become more melowed out ;)
     
  7. HockeyChic

    HockeyChic Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2006
    Messages:
    3,855
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I've thought about obedience training but I have no clue when I'd fit yet another "gotta run" in. I've had dogs in the past, usually small mutt dogs. This one is on her way to being a good girl, I just need to figure out how to make her listen to me. She's nearly as bad as the kids!! I did thenewspaper thing, but then I have a mess on the floor to clean up afterward. A friend of mine suggested the thump on the nose thing also. She refers to it as using the "Momma finger".
     
  8. Sir EvilFreeSmeg

    Sir EvilFreeSmeg Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2005
    Messages:
    15,434
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I wonder how many times Mew has been bit for pulling those stunts
     
  9. MadMachine

    MadMachine IncGamers Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Messages:
    1,471
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    255
    :laugh: I like the spraying water thing. I used to think that worked until my dog thought I was giving her a drink. Then I had a hyperactive dog with a soaked head running around on the furniture. But, meh, she's a Shih-Tzu cross so I just pick her up and huck her somewhere if she's being bad. (not really.)
     
  10. HockeyChic

    HockeyChic Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2006
    Messages:
    3,855
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It already takes both Ski and I to hold her in the tub for a bath, so, the water idea is definitely out. I do love, love, love the water thing for the cats!!!:wink3:
     
  11. SaroDarksbane

    SaroDarksbane IncGamers Site Pal

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2003
    Messages:
    8,563
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    467
    Two Words: Cattle Prod.

    :laugh:
     
  12. Quietus

    Quietus IncGamers Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2005
    Messages:
    5,470
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    346
    I don't know about #2, but 1 and 3 tend to work. Well, 3 depends ont he dog. But I wouldn't nip your mastiff unless you've got a problem with her biting. It's one of those things you save for certain situations.

    I've had a few Boxers in my lifetime, which are a sub-breed in a way... They're a mix of Bull Mastiff and British Bulldog, if memory serves. When our girls would bite, we'd nip them... lightly, however, and usually in the place they bit us. It was always playful biting, but after we told them not to, so discipline was needed.

    To stop her from putting her face on the table, when you're eating, use her leash to tie her somewhere - we tied ours to the bannister that led upstairs. After a few days of this, give them another chance - and as soon as she does it again, tie her back up. She'll learn fast.

    If it's other, general bad stuff (like flying leaps over furniture), put her in a dog cage. Yes, I know Mastiffs are not a small breed. It'll be worthwhile, however. She'll only need to be in there for a half hour to an hour, and Mastiffs are smart, she'll get the idea quick. A metal cage that can fold up, and has a metal pan in the bottom, is your best bet. That way, it can be easily stored later on.. and the metal pan is incredibly easy to clean.
     
  13. Merick

    Merick IncGamers Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2003
    Messages:
    6,862
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    466
    My little cairn terrier was nuts and willful for about a year. Then she mellowed out a lot. Just remember, don't yell/spray them unless you catch them in the act.
     
  14. HockeyChic

    HockeyChic Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2006
    Messages:
    3,855
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    0
    We got a bullmastiff because they are supposed to be "lazy, family guardian" type dogs. I expect her to be a bit of an idiot for awhile because she is afterall a puppy. I just wish the mellowing would happen quicker.
     
  15. {KOW}Spazed

    {KOW}Spazed Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2003
    Messages:
    11,578
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    My dogs had to be held on their back to let them know my family members are all bigger than they are. . .with a mastiff, that might not work.


    Puppies need to be played with, chase her around the yard, tug-of-war, fetch, etc. Then when she is all tired give her food. Let her see you get the food and place it on the floor. Don't let her push you around and make her wait a second after you set it down before she can dig in. That way, she will be tired and easier to deal with and she knows where the food comes from. If you leave out food all the time you can't take it away and expect any response.


    Call the Dog Whisperer.
     
  16. shacktack

    shacktack IncGamers Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2006
    Messages:
    144
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    41
    my dog still takes the cake when im not looking it goes nuts over any kind of food i want...starts to piss me off too
     
  17. Quietus

    Quietus IncGamers Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2005
    Messages:
    5,470
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    346
    It will, actually. If they're trying to force you around, this is the best way to put them in their place - roll them onto their back, and in the case of a boxer, or in this case a mastiff, you may be able to hold them there like that (depending on the dog), or you may need to actually straddle their chest. Careful doing this, however, as they may try and kick with their back legs out of confusion/surprise, and their claws may catch you.

    HockeyChic - That depends largely on the dog. My two girls, Chandra and Sheba, took a while to mellow out. Chandra lived to about eight years old, and she didn't mellow out for two years or so.. and even then, once you got her going, she was just like a sixty-seventy pound puppy. Sheba ended up dying of stomach cancer at 2 years old, she never lost her puppy-ness.

    Mastiffs are similar to boxers in temperment. Some, of course, will be lazier than my girls, some will be more hyper. However, I wouldn't count on her losing her hyperness within a year. If you're getting her spayed, that will help, Chandra was spayed around age two, and mellowed shortly after.

    As I'm sure you're learning, however, the breed is an extremely friendly one, and tends to be great with kids. You just need to remember to reinforce that she needs to play nice with small kids. As I mentioned, mastiffs are a smart breed, they'll pick up on this pretty quickly, and being firm with them will keep them behaving properly.
     
  18. Dondrei

    Dondrei IncGamers Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2005
    Messages:
    36,855
    Likes Received:
    30
    Trophy Points:
    467
    I've never had a dog of my own (my parents had one but since I moved out I've been living in units so no pets), so I'm no help.

    Ew.
     
  19. MadMachine

    MadMachine IncGamers Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2006
    Messages:
    1,471
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    255
    Maybe we should just ask your wife how she handles you.

    (Come on, you walked into that one easier than an AT-AT walker into a snowspeeder's tow cable.)
     
  20. Dondrei

    Dondrei IncGamers Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2005
    Messages:
    36,855
    Likes Received:
    30
    Trophy Points:
    467
    With a leash and a whip...
     

Share This Page