The Joe Biden gaffe thread.

Amra

Diabloii.Net Member
The Joe Biden gaffe thread.

Face it: it's time he has his own thread.

Vice President Joe Biden, well-known for his verbal gaffes, may have finally outdone himself, divulging potentially classified information meant to save the life of a sitting vice president.

According to a report, while recently attending the Gridiron Club dinner in Washington, an annual event where powerful politicians and media elite get a chance to cozy up to one another, Biden told his dinnermates about the existence of a secret bunker under the old U.S. Naval Observatory, which is now the home of the vice president.

The bunker is believed to be the secure, undisclosed location former Vice President Dick Cheney remained under protection in secret after the 9/11 attacks.

Eleanor Clift, Newsweek magazine's Washington contributing editor, said Biden revealed the location while filling in for President Obama at the dinner, who, along with Grover Cleveland, is the only president to skip the gathering.

According to Clift's report on the Newsweek blog, Biden "said a young naval officer giving him a tour of the residence showed him the hideaway, which is behind a massive steel door secured by an elaborate lock with a narrow connecting hallway lined with shelves filled with communications equipment."

Clift continued: "The officer explained that when Cheney was in lock down, this was where his most trusted aides were stationed, an image that Biden conveyed in a way that suggested we shouldn't be surprised that the policies that emerged were off the wall."

In December 2002, neighbors complained of loud construction work being done at the Naval Observatory, which has been used as a residence by vice presidents since 1974.

The upset neighbors were sent a letter by the observatory's superintendent, calling the work "sensitive in nature" and "classified" and that it was urgent it be completed "on a highly accelerated schedule."

Residents said they believed workers were digging deep into the ground, which would support Biden's report of a secret bunker, but officials never confirmed the purpose of the work performed.

The revelation is the latest from Biden, who has a long history of political blunders.

Most recently, he said in a televised interview that if a family member asked him about traveling he'd advise staying away from public transportation or confined spaces to avoid swine flu -- a remark described as "borderline fearmongering" by an airline spokesman.
I know that anyone who does that much public speaking is bound to mess up now again. So this is all in good fun. But c'mon......
 

Ariadne

Diabloii.Net Member
Re: The Joe Biden gaffe thread.

I watch "Have I Got News For You" on the BBC every week and get to see a lot of political gaffes. Usually by Gordon Brown though.
 

Amra

Diabloii.Net Member
Re: The Joe Biden gaffe thread.

Isn't the Queen going to take the paddle to him?
 

pancakeman

Diabloii.Net Member
Re: The Joe Biden gaffe thread.

My favorite remains the Roosevelt on TV in 1929 thing, but I have to say revealing the location of your own bunker is a very close second.
 

BobCox2

Diabloii.Net Member
Re: The Joe Biden gaffe thread.

Republicans, the media, and John Stewart have been yukking it up about what Joe Biden said to Katie Couric, "When the stock market crashed, Franklin D. Roosevelt got on the television and didn't just talk about the, you know, the princes of greed. He said, 'Look, here's what happened.'"

John Stewart sagely informs us that (1) "Roosevelt wasn't President when the stock market crashed" (in 1929), and (2) "no one had televisions". And The New York Times helpfully offers that "Herbert Hoover was president when the stock market crashed, in 1929. Roosevelt did not take office until March of 1933. When he did, Roosevelt communicated to the people over radio — not television."

Well ... apparently neither Stewart nor the Editorial Board of The New York Times are media historians.

Here's a little history for them:

1. Herbert Hoover (then Secretary of Commerce) and Walter S. Gifford (President of AT&T) participated in a conversation via television hook-up between Washington and New York in .... tada tada ... 1927!

2. FDR gave a televised address from the 1939 World's Fair in New York ... thereby becoming the first U.S. President to be televised.

3. FDR was televised from a Democratic Rally in Madison Square Garden in October, 1940.

So, here is what is TRUE about what Stewart, the New York Times, et al have been saying about Biden's gaffe: (1) FDR was indeed not President when the stock market crashed in 1929.

And, here is what is FALSE about what Stewart, the New York Times, et al have been saying about Biden's gaffe: (1) Contrary to what Stewart said, there was indeed television in 1927. (2) Contrary to what The New York Times said, although FDR was known for his fireside radio chats (see my The Soft Edge: A Natural History and Future of the Information Revolution for details), he indeed also communicated to Americans via television.

Now, television service was indeed much less common in the late 20s and the 30s and early 40s than it would soon after become, and Biden indeed was mostly in error in his statement to Couric ... But, media, next time you publicly take potshots at a VP, open a book, look around a little on the Web, get your facts right ... It's not that hard.
 

Amra

Diabloii.Net Member
Re: The Joe Biden gaffe thread.

But, media, next time you publicly take potshots at a VP, open a book, look around a little on the Web, get your facts right ... It's not that hard.
:rolf:

I am not going to hold my breath for that to happen!



 

pancakeman

Diabloii.Net Member
Re: The Joe Biden gaffe thread.

So Roosevelt got on TV, as president, in 1929 and addressed the American people?

Twist it how you like, he got all three points wrong. It was not a question of whether the technology existed, or whether he used it 11 years later, it was about whether he was:
A) President
B) On TV addressing the people.

Both are not true.
 

maccool

Diabloii.Net Member
Re: The Joe Biden gaffe thread.

I'm hoping Biden surpasses Quayle with regards to stupid statements. I would have thought that a difficult task.
 

Dondrei

Diabloii.Net Member
Re: The Joe Biden gaffe thread.

Joe who? He's one of those nobody-cares-VPs.

In the event of a major terrorist attack, they can have the VP anyway. They're like the Administration's mascot.
 

jmervyn

Diabloii.Net Member
Re: The Joe Biden gaffe thread.

I'm hoping Biden surpasses Quayle with regards to stupid statements. I would have thought that a difficult task.
You've proved your actual political affiliation yet again, Driveby. Quayle was a lightweight, but Biden was light-years ahead in the gaffe department before he was even elected. Or had you forgotten "slight Indian accent"?

This one is pretty good:
FOX said:
Here's a larger list:
FOX said:

Vice President Joe Biden has been keeping a low profile these days. But last week he popped into headlines when he clashed with aides to former President George W. Bush after claiming to have rebuked Bush in private meetings. Recalling a conversation during an interview with CNN, Biden said he told Bush in the Oval Office: "'Mr. President, turn and around look behind you. No one is following.'"

Karl Rove, Bush's top political adviser in the White House, called the conversation "fictional."

This isn't the first time Biden's comments have made news. From historical blunders and Internet gaffes to offensive jokes, Vice President Joe Biden is never shy a quotable moment.

Here's a list of 14 amusing yet cringe-worthy "Bidenisms" made during the vice president's more recent political career.

-- On March 13, 2009, Biden addressed a former Senate colleague by saying, "An hour late, oh give me a f**king break," after he arrived on Amtrak at Union Station in Washington, D.C. The vice president's expletive was caught on a live microphone.

-- During a Feb. 25, 2009, interview on CBS' "Early Show," Biden encouraged viewers to visit a government-run Web site that tracks stimulus spending. When asked for the site's web address, Biden could not remember the site's "number."

"You know, I'm embarrassed. Do you know the Web site number?" he asked an aide standing out of view. "I should have it in front of me and I don't. I'm actually embarrassed."

-- At a Jan. 30, 2009, swearing-in ceremony of senior White House staff, Biden mocked Chief Justice John Roberts for his presidential oath blunder on Inauguration Day.

"Am I doing this again?" Biden said, after Obama asked him to administer the oath. When Biden was told the swearing-in was for senior staff -- and not cabinet members -- the vice president quipped, "My memory is not as good as Justice Roberts," prompting a stern nudge from Obama.

-- On Inauguration Day, Jan. 20 2009, Biden misspoke when he told a cheering crowd of supporters, "Jill and I had the great honor of standing on that stage, looking across at one of the great justices, Justice Stewart." Justice John Paul Stevens -- not Stewart -- swore Biden in as vice president.

-- When criticizing former GOP nominee John McCain in Athens, Ohio, on Oct. 15, 2008, Biden said, "Look, John's last-minute economic plan does nothing to tackle the number-one job facing the middle class, and it happens to be, as Barack says, a three-letter word: jobs. J-O-B-S, jobs."

-- In a Sept. 22, 2008, CBS interview, Biden misspoke when he said Franklin D. Roosevelt was president when the stock market crashed in 1929.

"When the stock market crashed, Franklin D. Roosevelt got on the television and didn't just talk about the, you know, the princes of greed. He said, 'Look, here's what happened," he said. Herbert Hoover -- not Roosevelt -- was president in 1929, and television had not yet been invented in 1929.

-- During a Sept. 12, 2008, speech in Columbia, Mo., Biden called for Missouri State Sen. Chuck Graham, who is wheelchair-bound, to "stand up."

"Oh, God love ya," Biden said, after realizing his mistake. "What am I talking about?"

-- At a Sept. 10, 2008, town hall meeting in Nashua, N.H., Biden said, "Hillary Clinton is as qualified or more qualified than I am to be vice president of the United States of America. Quite frankly, it might have been a better pick than me."

-- Biden mistakenly referred to Alaska governor Sarah Palin as the "lieutenant governor" of her state during a town hall meeting on Sept. 4, 2008 at George Mason University in Manassas, Va.

"I heard a very, by the way I mean this sincerely, a very strong and a very good political speech from a lieutenant governor of Alaska who I think is going to be very formidable, very formidable not only in the campaign but in the debate," Biden said.

-- Biden said he was running for president -- not vice president -- during a Sept. 1, 2008, roundtable discussion in Scranton, Pa.

"Today is the moment for me as a United States senator running for president to put aside the national politics and focus on what's happening down there," Biden said.

-- Biden referred to John McCain as "George" during his vice presidential acceptance speech on Aug. 27, 2008, at the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Co. "Freudian slip, folks, Freudian slip," he explained.

-- Biden confused army brigades with battalions when speaking about Obama's plan for sending troops to Afghanistan.

"Or should we trust Barack Obama, who more than a year ago called for sending two additional combat brigades to Afghanistan?"

-- During his first campaign rally with Obama as his vice presidential running mate on Aug. 23, 2008, Biden introduced Obama by saying, "A man I'm proud to call my friend. A man who will be the next President of the United States -- Barack America!"

-- On Jan. 31, 2007 -- the day Biden announced his presidential bid -- the Delaware Senator was roundly criticized for calling Obama "the first mainstream African-American who is articulate and bright and clean and a nice-looking guy. I mean, that's a storybook, man."



 

Johnny

Banned
Re: The Joe Biden gaffe thread.

Personally I was looking forward to "vice president Palin" and her gaffles that would have put Biden to shame.

Oh well I guess everyone is safer with her in Alaska. On her porch keeping a check on the ruskies. Hehe, what a tool.
 

Tanooki

Diabloii.Net Member
Re: The Joe Biden gaffe thread.

Well I was looking forward to "president Clinton" and her gaffes that would have put the theoretical "vice president Palin"'s gaffes to shame.
 

Johnny

Banned
Re: The Joe Biden gaffe thread.

In 8 years my bigoted friend. in 8 years.

Or maybe 4 if you and your friends in white sheets manage to get a shot off on the commander in chief "for the good of the country"
 

HanShotFirst

Diabloii.Net Member
Re: The Joe Biden gaffe thread.

Looking for stupid statements . . . look no further . . .

"Rarely is the questioned asked: Is our children learning?" —Florence, S.C., Jan. 11, 2000

"They misunderestimated me." —Bentonville, Ark., Nov. 6, 2000

"There's an old saying in Tennessee — I know it's in Texas, probably in Tennessee — that says, fool me once, shame on — shame on you. Fool me — you can't get fooled again." —Nashville, Tenn., Sept. 17, 2002

"Our enemies are innovative and resourceful, and so are we. They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we." —Washington, D.C., Aug. 5, 2004

"I'll be long gone before some smart person ever figures out what happened inside this Oval Office."—Washington, D.C., May 12, 2008

Oh wait, we were looking for Joe Biden gaffes? Well you have to admit these Bush gaffes are so much more amusing. :wink:
 

Johnny

Banned
Re: The Joe Biden gaffe thread.

Yeah but calling Bush on saying something stupid is like playing basketball with a retarded kid and calling him for a double dribble. Some stuff you just need to let slide.
 

Raging_Zealot

Diablo: IncGamers Member
Re: The Joe Biden gaffe thread.

"Rarely is the questioned asked: Is our children learning?" —Florence, S.C., Jan. 11, 2000
The problem with that one is people changed the punctuation while typing it in order to make it wrong. It was said as "The question rarely asked is, are Children learning?" which is actually grammatically correct.



 
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