Stem Cell Update

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llad12

Diabloii.Net Member
Stem Cell Update

There was a recent breakthough in stem-cell research:

A team of South Korean scientists announced yesterday that they have discovered a highly efficient way to clone human cells, an advance that could alter the scientific and political debate over the procedure.

The researchers said they have created 11 new lines of cloned human embryonic stem cells, including, for the first time, two that are genetically matched to patients with a disease. This is the first step necessary for therapeutic cloning, a procedure in which patients might one day be treated with healthy nerve, blood, or other cells cloned from their own skin. The two disease-carrying cell lines, cloned from patients with juvenile diabetes and an inherited blood disorder, will offer researchers new ways of studying those maladies ...

What the South Korean team has been able to do is create human embryonic stem cells with the genetic material of particular patients. With cloning, also called nuclear transfer, the scientists take a cell from a patient, remove the cell's nucleus containing the genetic material, and place this nucleus in an egg cell that has had its own nucleus removed. This hybrid cell is then stimulated to grow for several days, until it becomes a nearly featureless ball of about 200 cells, a type of embryo known as a blastocyst.
Boston

Cool 'eh :clap:

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This was a timely breakthrough, as the House was getting prepared to vote on stem cell research

WASHINGTON -- House Republican leaders are throwing their weight behind a bill to encourage stem cell research that uses blood from umbilical cords. The measure offers an alternative to spending government money for research that would destroy human embryos.

House Speaker Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., had agreed earlier to allow a vote as soon as next week on a bill by Reps. Mike Castle, R-Del., and Diana DeGette, D-Colo., to lift President Bush's 2001 ban on the use of federal dollars for research using any new embryonic stem cells lines.
Washington Post

How about that? :thumbsup:

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Unfortunately, today, there appears to be a serious problem:

President Bush said today he would veto a measure that would ease restrictions on federal financing of the embryonic stem cell research if it is approved by Congress.

Mr. Bush, speaking with reporters in the Oval Office along with Anders Rasmussen, the prime minister of Denmark, was asked what he thought about legislation that may come up for a vote next week that would loosen restrictions the president himself imposed in August 2001 on federal financing of such research.

"I've made my position very clear on embryonic stem cells," he said. "I'm a strong supporter of adult stem cell research, of course. But I have made it very clear to the Congress that the use of federal money, taxpayers' money, to promote science which destroys life in order to save life is - I'm against that.

"And therefore, if the bill does that, I will veto it," said Mr. Bush, who has yet to veto a bill during his presidency.

He also said he was concerned by a report today from South Korean scientists that they are developing a cloning process that would produce human embryos that could then serve as the source of stem cells for medical and scientific uses.

"I'm very concerned about cloning," the president said. "I worry about a world in which cloning becomes acceptable."
NY Times

What the ****

:mad:

I am, again, disappointed with our President's decision.

There are so many potential advances that could be made with this line of research. So many diseases and injuries could be cured. So many lives saved.

But no! ... our administration kowtows to evangelical and far right-wing influences.

Jeez ...


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What do you think?

Should the US government support the research ... or ... invade South Korea?
 

axeil

Diabloii.Net Member
As a freedom loving American I think we should invade South Korea for their trecherous act of treachery. Who cares that they're our allies! They can't kill the little babies! They're all murderers that's it yup.

I was just readying everyone for the right wing's response. I do love logical arguments, I mean everything there is based on fact. No emotional logic there, no siree...
 

Namyeknom

Diabloii.Net Member
Ahh, the most delicate of issues.

I'm all for stem cell research, I think the advantages far out weigh any moral objections (not that I have any...).

If Mr. Bush does decide to invade South Korea to destroy their stem cells, could he stop by Newcastle, England on his way, they've just cloned some human embryos as well.

(Slight hi-jack, so ignore if desired, but in the case of congress voting for one thing, and the president veto-ing it, who represents the people? Surely congress were elected to serve the public will, but so was the president? Is the president like top trumps when it comes to this?)
 

Johnny

Banned
Im all for it. We need to take biological-engineering to the same lengths as we have mechanical-engineering.
 

Suicidal Zebra

Diabloii.Net Member
*shrug*

If Bush is against Human Embryo Cloning for the purposes of stem cell extraction then that is his prerogative. If he feels that he is so much against the Bill being proposed that he has to veto it if it is pass by congress then again that is up to him.

Whether his one opinion should be allowed to override the democraticly elected congress is another matter. One really does have to wonder.

Personally, I am very ambivalent about cloning in any form and would like to see other methods utilised first. But then again, I am neither religious, nor a biologist.
 

Steve_Kow

Banned
Harvard university conducts stemcell research, as do numerous other laboratories across the state. IIRC, the state of CT is funding a laboratory to conduct research.

Write a check if its important to you.
 

Suicidal Zebra

Diabloii.Net Member
Not sure that is really what llad is driving at Steve.

Unless of course Harvard Uni is allowed to do embryonic stem-cell research already. :confused:

Or am I missing something?
 

llad12

Diabloii.Net Member
Suicidal Zebra said:
Not sure that is really what llad is driving at Steve.

Unless of course Harvard Uni is allowed to do embryonic stem-cell research already. :confused:

Or am I missing something?
What do you not get?

In August 2001, President Bush banned federal funding for research on all new embryonic stem-cell lines. Scientists report that very few of the existing stem-cell lines are useful for research or even available to scientists.

Republicans are introducing a bill that would lift those restrictions.

Bush is going to veto it.

Read this:

The Republican sponsor of the House bill, Representative Mike Castle of Delaware, said today he was not dissuaded by the veto threat, and believes the measure will pass when it comes up for a vote Tuesday. And the sponsor of an identical Senate measure, Senator Arlen Specter, Republican of Pennsylvania, vowed to "bring the matter to a head" in his Senate subcommittee, which controls federal funding for medical research.

"The United States is being left farther behind every day, this morning by South Korea," said Mr. Specter. He added, "I don't like veto threats and I don't like comments about overriding the veto, but this issue is going to be the focal point of my subcommittee."

The Democratic leader in the Senate, Harry Reid of Nevada, said in a statement:

"Embryonic stem cell research provides us the hope of new cures and therapies and we should embrace this research opportunity and not allow radical ideology to stand in the way.

"President Bush has made the wrong choice, putting politics ahead of safe, responsible science."

At issue is whether to revamp a policy, announced in August 2001, in which Mr. Bush said he would permit federal financing for embryonic stem cell research, but only under tight restrictions. Scientists and patient advocates have been trying to loosen those restrictions ever since, and they have found prominent allies within the Republican party. Among them is Mr. Castle, a former governor of Delaware who is also president of the Republican Main Street Partnership, a group of moderates that is running a $1.5 million advertising campaign in favor of the research.
Federal financing is the key to embryonic stem-cell research. Without it, the research will falter and drag.

Individuals can donate money to private research ... but any such donations pale in comparision to what the government could offer.

Christ Almighty, Nancy Reagan is a supporter of federal funding for this research. Numerous Republican congressmen and senators support federal funding for this research. The majority of the American public supports federal funding.

Bush says no.
 

Beowulf

Diabloii.Net Member
This is the one of the future paths of medicine IMO and we should be investing into as much as possible.
 

Steve_Kow

Banned
llad12 said:
What do you not get?

In August 2001, President Bush banned federal funding for research on all new embryonic stem-cell lines. Scientists report that very few of the existing stem-cell lines are useful for research or even available to scientists.
I may be mistaken because its been some time since I've last looked into this, but I believe that Harvard is allowed to use their own private funds to create new embryonic stem cell lines.
 
In this regard, Bush is indeed a jerk and is setting this country medically back by 25 years. This particular issue is 78% of the reason he did not get my vote.

No need to go on a lengthy discourse about my observations, except the following brief remarks.

Not a single embryo dies because of stem-cell research. So, if, as in Bush's case, the issue of being against it is harm to what you might consider a human being (and stem-cells are taken from embryos less than a week old, without any developed brain cells yet, unlike the old fetal-cell research that used cells from aborted fetuses) then, you are doing no harm to additional embryos. The cells used in the research are from embryos that live and/or die in the thousands at fertility clinics.
The very fertility clinics Bush praised in his anti-stem-cell speeches of yore. Hypocrisy or blatant ignorance? You decide.
 

garion

Diabloii.Net Member
Actually most of the current stem cell lines are quite old and harvested over a decade ago, i would definately be up for reinstituting the harvesting and collecting of new stem cells , with new techniques involving robotics/automation.

I feel that the gains far outwiegh the risks involved. We are talking about the possibility of cloning organs, our own organs (if and when they might fail), with our very own stem cells harvested and stored at the time of birth (might be a bit late for me :D ), this could greatly reduce the burden of health care costs and nix many illnesses that require transplants. Imagine people who need a new cornea, liver, kidney, heart valve, perhaps even the possibility exploring the CNS surgeries that could replaced damage CNS organs like spinal cords/nerves. Someone suffering from cirrhosis of the liver, due to scarring caused by HCV could potentially replace the entire liver, instead of just a large portion (that will in time become diseased, yet again)...ok im just ranting now...

i support stem cell research :thumbsup:
 

llad12

Diabloii.Net Member
Steve_Kow said:
I may be mistaken because its been some time since I've last looked into this, but I believe that Harvard is allowed to use their own private funds to create new embryonic stem cell lines.
I have no doubt that what you say is true. The legality of such privately funded research is not in question. It is the federal funding of said research that is the crux of the matter here.
 
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