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Should a compliant be filed with the medical board?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by zodiac66, Jun 27, 2005.

  1. zodiac66

    zodiac66 IncGamers Member

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    Should a compliant be filed with the medical board?

    Some of you know my mother sufferes from congestive heart failure (CHF). She has had it for quite a few years now and is on oxygen. If she gets a minor cold, she usually ends up in the hospital for pnemonia (sp??) or bronchitis.

    She had to go last night. While in the ER, the doc asked her how much Albuterol she took every day. She replied none since her pulmonologist never prescribed any for her, ever. The ER doc asked her the name of her pulmonologist and when he heard the name, he replied "That figures. You should have been put on that as soon as you were on oxygen." From his tone and demeanor, it was obvious that the hospital has had problems with this pulmonologist.

    So, when is it appropriate to file a complaint with the medical board? Perhaps Albuterol was not that particular doctor's protocol.

    I wonder if she were put on some sort of maintenance program, she wouldn't have the numerous trips to the ER room. Usually when she is in the ER, her pulmonologist is on call and he treats her but for some reason, he was not available last night. I just wonder if he is bilking Medicare and my mother's secondary insurance at the expence of her health.
     
  2. DrunkCajun

    DrunkCajun Banned

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    My suggestion would be to find a doctor who does not know the pulmonologist and consult with him or her on the matter. Explain what happened, and see what he/she thinks you should do. My first instinct would be to report something like this, but I'd want to make sure I had the ammo to make it worth my time.
     
  3. AeroJonesy

    AeroJonesy IncGamers Member

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    I thought there was a settlement regarding using albuterol when you have a heart condition.

    http://www.medicinenet.com/albuterol/article.htm

    Sounds to me like albuterol isn't good if you have any sort of heart condition. Maybe you should file a complaint...with the doctor you saw in the ER. But I'd get a second opinion first.
     
  4. CyberHawk

    CyberHawk IncGamers Member

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    Going after people in the medical field is next to impossible..this came from several lawyers, after my grandad died from staph infection, my grandmother, aunt...and these people got money to...couldn't do a damn thing. They even had a doctor upfront say that "yes, that the hospital was the casue of this". Unclean tools, something...went in for a single bypass...never came home. Tried for 3 yrs to sue, or do something, anything!...got nothing.
    So dont waste you time on that..use that time to go to a differen doctor if possible, or talk to somebody who can help get you someone that might care better for her needs.
     
  5. Necrolestes

    Necrolestes IncGamers Member

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    The student doctor is in

    You have to be very, VERY careful when prescribing a beta-blocker like Albuterol to someone that has CHF (beta-blockers dilate bronchioles but also slow heart rate and someone that has CHF already has a slowed heart rate). I'm not a pulmonologist or even an internist but I wouldn't have prescribed albuterol without first checking the ejection fraction (how much blood the heart pumps in one contraction) to see if albuterol or other beta-blockers would be contraindicated. As a general rule, I would not prescribe albuterol to someone that has CHF. The first drugs that I would put them on are digoxin (this helps make the heart work more efficiently...it must be used with caution because it has a narrow window between helpful levels and harmful levels) and furosemide (a loop diuretic that helps remove fluid from around the heart).

    I do not know who that ER doctor was but I would think he needs a bit of retraining. If I, a third year medical student who knows very little about internal medicine, could figure out that she didn't need albuterol (her pulmonologist did the right thing, in my opinion, for whatever that's worth), then what the hell is his excuse for getting it wrong?
     
  6. Yaboosh

    Yaboosh IncGamers Member

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    And so what did we learn from the student's post? Get a second opinion from another specialist and don't take an ER doctor's word (or a student's word) for absolute truth. (No offense necro)
     
  7. Necrolestes

    Necrolestes IncGamers Member

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    I second that emotion

    No offense taken. The whole reason I preface every piece of medical information with "a third year medical student" is so that everyone knows that though this advice comes from someone in the medical field, it does not come from an expert. The rule of thumb is: get a second opinion.
     

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