Question for musicians (or physicists)

Anyee

Diabloii.Net Member
Question for musicians (or physicists)

I've been googling for this, but with no luck, so I'm turning to the OTF. How many hertz are in a semitone, i.e. C to C#?
 

publius

Diabloii.Net Member
I actually derived it with a couple of other people. A middle C is about 262 Hz. A note above middle C's frequency is 262*2^(x/12), where x is the number of half-steps above C.

So for example C# is one half-step above C, so its frequency is 262*2^(1/12), or about 278.

Edit: whoops, I forgot that we were deriving it for my B flat trumpet, 262 is actually B flat. So normally, a C is 278, a C# is 278*2^(1/12) or about 294 (it works the same, just one step higher).
 

Anyee

Diabloii.Net Member
Hrm, so in the range of 28 Hz. Use A, though. Better waveform. My tuner's at my gf's house and it allows minute changes in Hz.
 

Steel_Avatar

Diabloii.Net Member
It depends on the octave.

Here you go:

freq = base*2(x/12)

Base is any base frequency. Generally, A = 440 Hz is the accepted frequency. From here, X is the relative position of the note, going up. You can't go down. In your case Anyee, choose a base C, say 523.25 Hz (same octave as our A). C# is one position up, relative to C. Toss that into your calculator, and away you go.
 
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