Pies.

Machina

Diabloii.Net Member
I also noticed this. In the UK pie usually refers to a meat pie as well. When talking about a 'sweet' pie we usually use the full name e.g apple pie.

I actually first realised the difference when I first heard about American Pie the film. I thought it was going to be a meat pie :point:
 

Quietus

Diabloii.Net Member
I also noticed this. In the UK pie usually refers to a meat pie as well. When talking about a 'sweet' pie we usually use the full name e.g apple pie.

I actually first realised the difference when I first heard about American Pie the film. I thought it was going to be a meat pie :point:


Hmm... well, I suppose that in a few ways that could have added to the innuendo. On the other hand, I think it would have brought the WTF factor down a few steps.



 

sungam

Diabloii.Net Member
I lived in Oz for a year when I was 16 and worked at the 4 and 20 pie factory in melbourne - all the pies you could eat for free!

I really liked the way that when you bought a pie in a shop that they would push the end of the tomato sauce dispenser actually into the pie before dispensing the sauce so that it was mixed up inside the pie and not falling off the top - that plus the ridiculously low price of meat (although I was there during a drought I believe) which worked well for an inveterate meat eater like myself
 

Dondrei

Diabloii.Net Member
For some reason I read that as "invertebrate meat eater", which given the quality of most meat pies actually makes sense...
 

Sokar Rostau

Diabloii.Net Member
My all-time favourite meat pie commercial. Click the "Sargent's on TV" link at the bottom.

You know, I made a post in this thread a few days ago, about some of the delicious pies available in my area (I live not very far from a pie shop that is considered a tourist attraction), and now it's gone. Got some stuff to do now, so I'll repost later, some of you will probably be surpriused at the variety.
 

DurfBarian

Diabloii.Net Member
1883, "fastidious man," New York City slang of unknown origin. The vogue word of 1883, originally used in ref. to the devotees of the "aesthetic" craze, later applied to city slickers, especially Easterners vacationing in the West (dude ranch first recorded 1921). Surfer slang application to any male is first recorded c.1970. Female form dudine (1883) has precedence over dudess (1885).
 
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