(OT) What Generation Are You?

What Generation Are You?

  • Greatest Generation (Born between 1901 and 1927)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Baby Boomer (Born between 1946 and 1964)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Generation Z (Typically use birth years 1997 to mid-2010s)

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    54

Drystan

Diabloii.Net Member
Very simple poll. What Generation are you? Public poll, so visible to all, regardless of voting.
Source: Generations of the Western World.

I am a Millennial, although sometimes feel like I fit into Boomer status ('Where's the 'Post New Thread' button?') and Millennial status. I am less adept with newer technology than I used to be growing up. As I am trying to type this post, I am having Boomer level of difficulties finding all the relevant features, the current one being a hyperlink option...

I have left off the Lost Generation, as that includes people born between 1883 and 1900, as well as Generation Alpha, those born post 2015'ish.
 

Timinator

Diabloii.Net Member
Not surprised by the results so far, most of us were at a certain age when Diablo 1 and 2 came out. We had a lot of time available to play, we got addicted. In other decades there have been more other gens. Some have stopped playing, some don't come to this forum now
 

CaseyJones

Diabloii.Net Member
I'm at the tail end of Generation X. I imagine many in the millenial group were at the head end of theirs. Most of us probably fall within a 10 year span.
 
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Arctodus

Diabloii.Net Member
I'm at the tail end of Generation X. I imagine many in the millenial group were at the head end of theirs. Most of us probably fall within a 10 year span.
Exaclty my thoughts. Very beggining of the ‘’Millenials’’ era here. I always thought that these categories were pretty weak. I’m suppose to be a millenials, but sure don’t feel like one. When I was young, 8-bit NES was all the rage, even played a ton of Atari. But, more importantly, I was young before Internet was everywhere; I saw the rise of the Internet as we know it. Someone born in 1994 ? No way we have the same cultural references; the difference is just too large.

I know that these are the types of categories that are merely tools to make general assumptions, but I don’t think they work on a conceptual level, the birth of Internet being an enormous cultural shift that should warrant a revision of those categories.
 

Grisu

Diabloii.Net Member
Interesting poll, and no easy answer. Considering my birthdate (1983) I'd fall under Generation Y, but I would consider myself part Generation X, too (detatched and self-absorbed at least in my free time? count me in!). Maybe it is because I feel that there is such a huge gap (???maybe only felt, but not actually there??) between myself and the younger people of generation Y...I mean, some of generation Y haven't even started working yet...and while I might be a digital native for C64 and early PC, I am by no means a digital native in regards to mobiles (got my first in 2004 or so and my first smartphone 5 years ago) or newer stuff. Also, I grew up in a time where Germany was still divided, and the generation born in the late 80s or early 90s doesn't remember that, so maybe there is more of a divide in that generation in Germany...I don't know.
 

SevenArkZ

Diabloii.Net Member
I was born in early 1983, making me nearly 37 now. Although I do not like these generational labels, I am considered a millenial but fit in more with Generation X. The term I have heard thrown around for this is "Xennial", a so called "micro-generation" born between 1977 and 1985.

Someone born in 1994 ? No way we have the same cultural references; the difference is just too large.

I agree! When I was very little I remember using our rotary phone, our household didn't have internet until I was in the later part of middleschool (AOL), I went out to play early in the day and didn't come back until the street lights came on, and getting in touch with someone meant picking up a phone or writing a letter. Being born in the early 80s vs mid 90s makes for a much different lifestyle growing up.
 

Drystan

Diabloii.Net Member
Mid-millennial, and I grew up with NES, Commodore 64, and our primary schools had 0-2 computers in classrooms, and a computer room we had to walk to to learn typing/spelling/grammar skills. In high school, not everyone had a phone, although they were becoming more common and accessible.
I imagine the early millennials may not' have even had a computer in the class room, whereas those born in 1996 (~24 this year, so still very young, and a couple years out of university,) would have grown up with a phone, laptop/personal pc.

I see where the definitions are very generalised and those at the start of a category could have very different developmental/technological experiences than one born at the end of the category. They are just general guide, from the wiki articles (easiest and first definitions I could find.) But it might've been slightly better to define generations on community/technological advances - we had dial-up where if we received a phone call, our internet cut out, and families had to pay for each call. But others have debated how to classify generations, and these are what we have.

I know we have had some younger members join, and several of the older generations as well over the years, but not surprised most fall into Millennial/GenX. I mean, Diablo 1 came out in 1997, and D2 in 2000, so our age ranges were growing up with technology inside houses, and a very limited number of gaming companies/releases at the time, compared with 20 years later.
 

Zyr

Diabloii.Net Member
I see where the definitions are very generalised and those at the start of a category could have very different developmental/technological experiences than one born at the end of the category. They are just general guide, from the wiki articles (easiest and first definitions I could find.) But it might've been slightly better to define generations on community/technological advances - we had dial-up where if we received a phone call, our internet cut out, and families had to pay for each call. But others have debated how to classify generations, and these are what we have.
I qualify (barely) as one of the "silent generation" (per the chosen category designations). If there's merit to that particular name, it's probably because you youngsters wouldn't believe me if I broke my silence, to tell you what it was like, comin' up...

The first telephone I ever saw or used (on a farm in Kansas, circa 1950) was housed in a wooden box, mounted on a wall. A microphone protruded from the box, to which a separate hand-held earphone was attached by a cloth-covered cord. When one wished to initiate a call, one turned a crank on the side of the box, which summoned the attention of a human "operator" (always female) at the telephone exchange.

A few years later, our first home phone number was 2128-M. That phone was of black bakelite construction, with both microphone and earphone integrated in a single receiver, which rested on a base unit when not in use. To initiate a call, one took the receiver off the hook, thereby automatically attracting the attention of the operator. One received a call by paying careful attention to the rhythm of the rings. The -M in 2128-M designated a "party line" which was shared by multiple customers. Each customer on a party line had a different ring pattern (one ring, pause... two rings, pause... three rings, pause... etc.) The only thing preventing one from listening in on a neighbor's calls was a sense of honor. We did get a dial phone at some point before I went to high school.

Ah, high school! I was an unabashed geek, and proudly wore my calculator in its leather holster for all to see. This was a true solid state device (solid magnesium, in fact), which required no electricity, from any source, ever. That yellow Pickett and Eckel slide rule was one of my most treasured possessions, ever, and I sure wish I could get my hands on it again.

This is all the absolute truth, but I suspect no one else participating in this forum has the cultural framework to believe me. You'd probably think I was, er, stretching things a bit, as Frank Hayes may have done in writing this song:


Nah, I'd best accept my role as a member of the "silent generation" because you wouldn't believe me anyway.
 

DariusTriplet

Diabloii.Net Member

PhineasB

Diabloii.Net Member
Amazing post @Zyr thanks for sharing. Not in my direct personal experience, but definitely appreciate reminder that the “stories” from my era (I had early access to dial-up internet relative to peers in middle school) were amazing innovations to others for whom private telephone lines were unimaginable progress.
 
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zemaj

Diabloii.Net Member
Well, I'm by that metric a millenial, but as others have said I definitely don't identify with what is usually referenced as "millenials think/like/etc" and tend to think of most people that refer to themselves as millenials as "those dumb 'kids'..." That said, we were pretty dumb ourselves, but growing up a "hey! Watch this!" was confined to the people in the immediate area, and who they might tell as opposed to the entirety of the internet, forever...

@Zyr while I never used one of those old wooden phones, I definitely remember those bakelite rotary wall & desk phones that where not only nigh indestructible, but also heavy enough to fracture a foot if they happened to fall off the desk. I always thought that one of those would make an excellent cudgel, if one was ever assaulted in a proximity to a desk...
 
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