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Neato! Water was on Mars

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by maccool, Mar 2, 2004.

  1. maccool

    maccool IncGamers Member

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    Neato! Water was on Mars

    Looks like those scientists in their Ivory towers got it right. The latest from JPL.

    I must say that I've never heard of jarosite. Of course, it's not common and I don't work in low-T systems. There's still a lot of debate going on, but it looks as if Mars had water once. Maybe not on the surface or anything, but still.

    Oh, Llad, this quote is for you:

    Yeah, all us field geologists carry X-ray Spectrometers and Mossbauer spectrometers into the bush. :lol:
     
  2. MixedVariety

    MixedVariety Banned

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    I don't know about you, but I we chemists always carry around our pocket model High Pressure Liquid Chromatography gear with us. Get with the times, Mac.
     
  3. Wuhan_Clan

    Wuhan_Clan IncGamers Member

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    Link isn't working because you put an extra "http://" in front. A working link is here.

    Anyways, until we find a large quantity of actual water in liquid form, this is no reason to bring out the good booze.
     
  4. llad12

    llad12 IncGamers Member

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    Ya right ... a Brunton compass, hand lens, and alidade/plane table maybe. :surprise:

    I listened to the NASA presentation today on the web. They provided good strong evidence for those particular outcrops being saturated with liquid water. Whether it was ground water or sedimentary deposits from a lacustrine environment is still up for grabs. Noting the possible cross-stratification in one of the outcrops, there is a good chance of the latter.

    I can't say that I am really surprised at these findings noting the Martian landforms that have been photographed. However, it is still satisfying to have some good field evidence to support these conclusions.

    They mentioned future rovers may have the ability to bring back some of the investigated rocks to Earth for future study. That would be cool ... 'eh Mac ?

    I wish I could have been able to ask them a question or two. I would have like to heard what they thought about all those gullies that are apparent in some of the craters. Many (if not most) of them seem to be of near-recent origin. They mentioned that ground water may exist at some considerable depth on Mars in the subsurface today. If so, then how do those gullies and associated sedimentary fan aprons form if not from ground water very close to the surface?
     
  5. AeroJonesy

    AeroJonesy IncGamers Member

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    Woohoo! Now we just need more development on water-fed space propulsions systems and we'll have a lovely place to refuel!
     
  6. Pain Probe

    Pain Probe IncGamers Member

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    I think this is great stuff. Why do we need to send people there when we can do the science remotely at a fraction of the cost?
     
  7. DurfBarian

    DurfBarian IncGamers Member

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    Because nobody ever got reelected on the basis of inspirational announcements involving spectrometers. :D
     
  8. AeroJonesy

    AeroJonesy IncGamers Member

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    Why would you rather have a human driver drive your car as opposed to an auto-pilot?

    There's so much that can go wrong on a mission, and without the intelligence of a human right there, often there's nothing that can be done to fix it.
     
  9. MixedVariety

    MixedVariety Banned

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    I tend to both agree, and disagree, with your point of view. I think sending 'robots' first and gathering as much information as possible would be prudent. When it's time to send people, send them with the intention of staying a while in a semi-permanent base for prolonged study, rather than an expensive, short visit.
    More easily said than done, of course.
     
  10. AeroJonesy

    AeroJonesy IncGamers Member

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    Mixed, I was going to say something along those lines, but went to do something else, then came back and hit the submit button. Robots are great for doing preliminary work. Before we go risking people's lives, we have to have an accurate assesment of the environment we'll be sending them into. Once we have gotten as much data as we can from robots, we end up spending lots of money sending them there when we can't learn anything new. That's when it's time for the human exploration. I mean, the rovers are going to be active for months and they're going to travel a thousand feet or some such. Give humans a rover and they can travel much farther than that.
     
  11. Pain Probe

    Pain Probe IncGamers Member

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    Does Challenger or Columbia ring a bell? Very often if something goes wrong as you put it, there ain't no one left alive to fix the problem.
     
  12. LunarSolaris

    LunarSolaris IncGamers Member

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    Great... now it's only a matter of time before they start bottling the stuff and selling us "Martian Evian water" for $1.25.

    ... because Evian spelled backwards is STILL naive.
     
  13. Anakha1

    Anakha1 Banned

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    Water on mars, hmm? Now all we need to do is find a natural supply of gin and we're in business.
     
  14. Ash Housewares

    Ash Housewares IncGamers Member

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    everytime this comes up I ask

    does ANYONE know anything about some 15th(I think) century painting that depicts Mars as having ice caps, I know I've seen this somewhere
     
  15. DurfBarian

    DurfBarian IncGamers Member

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  16. Steel_Avatar

    Steel_Avatar IncGamers Member

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    2 incidents in how many shuttle flights, and in how many years of manned flight?
     
  17. Choogy

    Choogy IncGamers Member

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    Well, we've expected the whole polar ice cap thingies...

    Didn't Long John Silvers have a free shrimp deal if NASA found water on Mars...?
     
  18. Crispyknight

    Crispyknight IncGamers Member

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    Not excatly the same instrument, but here we're builing a GC/MS that weighs less than five pounds excluding the pump. THe ion trap is about the size of a quarter, and the quadrapole isn't a whole lot bigger. Cool stuff, I tells ya!
     
  19. maccool

    maccool IncGamers Member

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    Thanks for the save on the link, Wuhan.

    I agree Llad, I'm kind of envisioning a briny puddle near a geothermal vent or something. I reckon that any liquid water on the surface would have to be near a geological heat source, given that it's balls cold on Mars.

    There probably was free water on Mars long ago. But now that Mars is dead - that is to say a lack of recent volcanism and plate tectonics- there is no more heat coming from the 'mantle' (dunno if Mars has one of those) and the Sun can't warm things up enough for liquid water to exist at the surface. Lousy Mars and it's being tiny.

    The U.S and Soviet space programs have lost a total of 21 astronauts/cosmonauts. Not too shabby. Of course, we really haven't tried to go any further than our front porch, the moon.
     
  20. Yaboosh

    Yaboosh IncGamers Member

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    How should we know? We only heard about those two.
     

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