I need more sci-fi authors

Merick

Diabloii.Net Member
I need more sci-fi authors

Thanks to the library and www.paperbackswap.com I am rapidly running out of books by authors that I like.

The following is a list of sci-fi authors that I have read books by and have made up my mind about and devoured or dismissed. I'm really just interested in sci-fi. Starred ones are ones that I especially would like to find more writters like. Please feel free to recommend authors not on this list:

Isaac Asimov*
Arthur C. Clarke*
Robert Heinelin
Stephen Baxter*
Robert Sawyer*
Robert McCammon
Terry Pratchett
James P. Hogan
Vernor Vinge*
Connie Willis*
Robert Charles Wilson*
Orson Scott Card*
David Weber*
Richard Garfinkle*
Robert Reed
Michael Crichton
Dan Brown
Ray Bradbury

Edit- Here's a list of books I've read (other than the hundreds of R. L. Stein and Christopher Pike slush of my young teen years) with ratings: http://www.bibliophil.org/library/UserLibrary.php?v_UserName=manorastroman
 

superdave

Diabloii.Net Member
have you tried anything by the woman who wrote the book shown in my tar?
<<<

lee chapman is a pen name for marion zimmer bradley...she is known more for her sword and sorceress and camelot type novels than her scifi...but she did write a few excellent scifi stories...her darkover series straddles both genres.
 

Sokar Rostau

Diabloii.Net Member
I hated it, but that was mainly because a friend bugged me to read it for almost two years before I gave in. Just because I wasn't a fan doesn't mean you won't be.

Otherland by Tad Williams

It's set about 15 years in the future and is mainly in a totally immersive VR world. Some of the ideas in it I thought were really interesting, I just didn't like the style and some of the characterization.
 

buttershug

Diabloii.Net Member
Phillip K. Dick
By far the best not on your list.
He wrote Do Androids Dream of Androids?
And Memories for Sale Wholesale.
 

Sokar Rostau

Diabloii.Net Member
buttershug said:
Phillip K. Dick
By far the best not on your list.
He wrote Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
And We Can Remember it for You Wholesale.
Fixed it, to the best of my memory and at Superdave's suggestion.
 

Merick

Diabloii.Net Member
superdave said:
have you tried anything by the woman who wrote the book shown in my tar?
<<<
*squints* I don't know.

lee chapman is a pen name for marion zimmer bradley...she is known more for her sword and sorceress and camelot type novels than her scifi...but she did write a few excellent scifi stories...her darkover series straddles both genres.
Oh. Nope.
Judging from her Wiki article, she's wrote quite a few books. Only a few of the obviously fantasy books have pages though. Should I start with The Keeper's Price for the darkover series? The darkover series does sounds interesting, I love the 'starting civilization over' type books a lot.

Sokar said:
I hated it, but that was mainly because a friend bugged me to read it for almost two years before I gave in. Just because I wasn't a fan doesn't mean you won't be.

Otherland by Tad Williams

It's set about 15 years in the future and is mainly in a totally immersive VR world. Some of the ideas in it I thought were really interesting, I just didn't like the style and some of the characterization.
Eh, I generally find the VR stuff cheesy. What was it about the style you didn't like?

Butter said:
Phillip K. Dick
By far the best not on your list.
He wrote Do Androids Dream of Androids?
And Memories for Sale Wholesale.
I really don't like government conspiracy, drug, 'what is reality?' and surreal books.
 

Cannon Fodder

Diabloii.Net Member
I'm going to throw Anne McCaffrey in the mix. She's written quite a lot, some of it fantasy, some scifi, and some a bit blurry between the two. I've never been one to make a big fuss about the difference anyways.

She is excellent at building real and complex characters, and tends towards long series which really suck you in. Her Pern and Talent series would be where I would start. The Talent series is probably a bit more scifi, though the Pern series is longer and a bit more indepth.


Oh, and out of curiosity- anyone else read any of the Halo books?
 

Merick

Diabloii.Net Member
Cannon Fodder said:
I'm going to throw Anne McCaffrey in the mix. She's written quite a lot, some of it fantasy, some scifi, and some a bit blurry between the two. I've never been one to make a big fuss about the difference anyways.

She is excellent at building real and complex characters, and tends towards long series which really suck you in. Her Pern and Talent series would be where I would start. The Talent series is probably a bit more scifi, though the Pern series is longer and a bit more indepth.


Oh, and out of curiosity- anyone else read any of the Halo books?
I told myself not to forget her, but I did. I read her living ships books (and wow, according to Wiki, there are quite a few). They were good, but not good enough to pursue her further. How do her other works compare to them?
 

superdave

Diabloii.Net Member
Sokar Rostau said:
Fixed it, to the best of my memory.
fix the 2nd one too..."we can remember it for you wholesale" was the short story written by dick that the movie total recall was based on.
 

Selisteil

Diabloii.Net Member
John Ringo, David Drake, Eric Flint. They are each quite a good read nomatter the book.
Have you read the Honor harrington series by David Weber? if not I highly recommend it.
Try Baen.com for alot of idea's they have a free library with a good seletion of books. Good for a sample taste if you can't stand a book on a computer.
 

Dondrei

Diabloii.Net Member
I know I say this in every book thread, but LARRY NIVEN!!!

He's my favourite sci-fi author. Check out Ringworld and the Ringworld Engineers in particular. Avoid The Ringworld Throne at all costs.

superdave said:
have you tried anything by the woman who wrote the book shown in my tar?
What the hell is that book anyway?

Sokar Rostau said:
Otherland by Tad Williams

It's set about 15 years in the future and is mainly in a totally immersive VR world. Some of the ideas in it I thought were really interesting, I just didn't like the style and some of the characterization.
Is Otherland as good as his Memory, Sorrow and Thorn books? I was considering reading them a while back but I never found the time.
 

Sokar Rostau

Diabloii.Net Member
I think the main problem I had with the Otherland books was that I thought there were too many characters and most seemed flat. I liked that each character came from a different country/culture but once you meet every character and find out what makes each one different it just came across as a bit cheesy.

You have the "proud black woman" computer lecturer from South Africa and her Kalahari Bushman sidekick, the sick kid from America, the blind French woman, the Australian Aborigine serial killer (and the cops tracking him down) that serves the bidding (for the most part) of the 130 year old maniac that leads the greedy cabal in their quest for immortality via the intarwebs, the really young girl with the mysteriously deformed friend (an old man in a wheelchair) that is the only one that can save the world... and a bunch of others each with their own special flaws and abilities... Oh yeah, and iirc, the VR world the cabal creates (much more real than the usual immersive internet and VR games) becomes self aware (but that last may be a false memory after watching Terminator the other night).

I'm not saying it was bad, just not to my taste. I HATE the theory that every character has to have something to make them stand out, and this book has it in spades.

Dondrei said:
Is Otherland as good as his Memory, Sorrow and Thorn books? I was considering reading them a while back but I never found the time.
Aside from Tolkein, Umberto Eco, David Eddings, Stephen King and a bunch of Classics, Otherland is the only fiction I have read in a decade and convinced me that reading non-fiction is much more rewarding. My friend loves Tad Williams though, so remember that this is just my opinion and I'm probably not the best judge.
 

llad12

Diabloii.Net Member
buttershug said:
Phillip K. Dick
By far the best not on your list.
He wrote Do Androids Dream of Androids?
And Memories for Sale Wholesale.
I believe the novel was Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Merick: I will second Larry Niven. You might try Jerry Pournelle as well.
 

Cannon Fodder

Diabloii.Net Member
Merick said:
I told myself not to forget her, but I did. I read her living ships books (and wow, according to Wiki, there are quite a few). They were good, but not good enough to pursue her further. How do her other works compare to them?

Honestly, I think I've only read one in that series, and I'm pretty sure it wasn't the first. That doesn't leave me a whole lot of room to judge, but the one I read didn't really inspire me to go out and get the others. The other two series I mentioned were much more enthralling for me. If you have any interest in ESP and the like and would enjoy a unique perspective on it, try the Talent series. The Pern series is about a group of people who get fed up with high tech society and decide to start over elsewhere. It quickly moves beyond the scope of that premise, but since you said you enjoy those this may be worth a look for you. While I enjoyed the early books, it is the later ones that really stick with me. She develops a cast of characters that you can follow basically from birth to death over the course of the later series. I'd say give one of the two series a look at least, in my expereicne they are her very best work.
 

superdave

Diabloii.Net Member
dondrei said:
What the hell is that book anyway?
the book in my tar? it has the best title of any book...ever.

i am a lesbian.​
you see that title on a bookshelf and you HAVE to pick it up..."her kind of love was different...but was it wrong?" marketing genius!

http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/b/marion-zimmer-bradley/i-am-lesbian.htm

over the last couple years i have picked up enough copies of this book to sell to discriminating collectors to keep the taxes current on my house.
 

Carnage-DVS

Diabloii.Net Member
Phillip pulman, the Dark Materials trilogy. Good stuff. The Golden Compass is the first book.

By the way, The Last Vampire series was teh awesome+1.
 

Merick

Diabloii.Net Member
Just a note, I'm either going off my knowledge of these people, Wikipedia, or a combination for my information that forms my opinions.

Puck Nutty said:
William Gibson is conspicuously absent from your list.

Hey, dude's got a website.

http://www.williamgibsonbooks.com
Oh yeah, the cyberpunk guy. I don't really like the idea. I suppose Neuromancer deserves a shot, as it's a classic.

Selis said:
John Ringo, David Drake, Eric Flint. They are each quite a good read nomatter the book.
Have you read the Honor harrington series by David Weber? if not I highly recommend it.
Try Baen.com for alot of idea's they have a free library with a good seletion of books. Good for a sample taste if you can't stand a book on a computer.
John Ringo - I remember now I tried to read one of his books. I learned that I don't like military sci-fi.
David Drake - Sounds like more miltary sci-fi. Hard to get an opinion from his Wiki article.
Eric Flint - Apparently he wrote a somewhat interesting sounding Belisarius series with David Drake. And apparently the first three books are available for free online. I'll check it out later.

Dondrei said:
I know I say this in every book thread, but LARRY NIVEN!!!

He's my favourite sci-fi author. Check out Ringworld and the Ringworld Engineers in particular. Avoid The Ringworld Throne at all costs.
I should have put him in the list. I tried to read The Integral Trees, but lost interest. I should probably give him another chance. I should have put Frank Herbert in the list too, dagumit. And the guy who wrote Deepsix.

llad said:
Merick: I will second Larry Niven. You might try Jerry Pournelle as well.
He seems to have co-written a lot of books with Niven. I am somewhat wary of dual-authored books as I'm on a pretty terrible streak with them. Starswarm and others sound interesting though. I'll give him a try.

Cannon said:
Honestly, I think I've only read one in that series, and I'm pretty sure it wasn't the first. That doesn't leave me a whole lot of room to judge, but the one I read didn't really inspire me to go out and get the others. The other two series I mentioned were much more enthralling for me. If you have any interest in ESP and the like and would enjoy a unique perspective on it, try the Talent series. The Pern series is about a group of people who get fed up with high tech society and decide to start over elsewhere. It quickly moves beyond the scope of that premise, but since you said you enjoy those this may be worth a look for you. While I enjoyed the early books, it is the later ones that really stick with me. She develops a cast of characters that you can follow basically from birth to death over the course of the later series. I'd say give one of the two series a look at least, in my expereicne they are her very best work.
Ok, I think I'll try the Pern series if I can find the first book.

Edit: You're all keeping me busy :smiley:

Xenon said:
Jack mcKinney
Allen steele
Ahh, Robotech. I remember watching it on Toonami when Moltar hosted. Not sure if I'd like to read a book about it though.
Allen's Coyote series sounds interesting, but there isn't much on him in Wikipedia. What can you tell me about him?

Carnage said:
Phillip pulman, the Dark Materials trilogy. Good stuff. The Golden Compass is the first book.

By the way, The Last Vampire series was teh awesome+1.
This His Dark Materials trilogy sounds interesting. Is it kinda like The Talisman by Stephen King as far as alternate universes?
And yes, reading The Last Vampire series was good fun. I still remember being disapointed that the cliffhanger at the end of the first one was largely ignored at the beginning of the second though. Pike also had that series with the group of kids in the weird city. And the one kid always wore 4 watches, and he died, but his self from another dimension or something joined them. The library was so slow in getting those books.
 

DurfBarian

Diabloii.Net Member
Ursula K. LeGuin. She did the Earthsea fantasy stuff, but she also has things like The Left Hand of Darkness that rocks.

I haven't read his books yet, but John Scalzi has a website that's interesting to poke around, and you can read some of his work there.

This story is awesome, especially if you're a fan of H.P. Lovecraft. It made me want to read more by Charles Stross. (He has a website too with some writing available on it.)
 
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