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Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Deepstrike, Aug 28, 2010.

  1. Deepstrike

    Deepstrike Banned

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    Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

    intro (the unnecessary read)

    I will simplify this whole thing now by saying that if you want to get big, eat more and lift more; if you want to slim down, eat less and do more cardio.

    For anyone still reading...

    I've created this thread in response to a few requests from those looking for a little advice, and to make it a little easier for someone to find the information in one place.

    First thing I will say however before anyone reads the numerous walls of text, is that it really isn't a science, there is no template. What might work for one person may/will need adapting for someone else. Only you can do this by getting to know what works for you over time. For example I know that I can only do a heavy leg day once every 4 days, otherwise my lifts will drop.

    A little info on me. Received a diploma in both Personal Training and Nutrition whilst finishing my masters @ Uni. Nutrition and the philosophies of training for different sports always interested me, and rather than simply following advice, I wanted to learn. However, I will say that I have learnt more by reading and then putting into practise different "sciences" and theories than actually studying it. So I only recommend or advise something if I have tried it myself.

    I used to be a sprinter for Derby (100m/200m) so I was always fairly lean/slim, but during my first years of Uni I dedicated myself to packing on some size and managed 15st @ ~12-15% BF. To do this I pretty much did what is to be stated in the bulking portion of this write up. And quite frankly I didn't enjoy eating that much to get there. So I've been both on ends of the scale. I now maintain 12st 5lbs - ~13st @ ~8% for the most part, but I am shredding down to 6%BF for when I move to Syndey and pick up where I left off in modelling. The logic is that I can then bulk till I reach 12% BF, as the lower it is when I start then the lower it will be when I finish. Once @ 12% I'll stay there.

    I've decided to do this with a little less of a general approach and have it so that one can hopefully tailor the information to suit them along the way.



    Calories
    Regardless of your goal (bulking/cutting) it helps to know how many calories your body burns naturally (BMR) + exercise (TDEE). Knowing this you can then eat more/less depending on your goals.

    BMR (Basal Metabolic Rate) = 66 + (6.23 x weight lbs) + (12.7 x height inches) - (6.8 x age in years)

    TDEE (Total Daily Energy Expenditure)
    For this you use a multiplier, dependent on your activity level, to multiply your BMR.

    • sedentary - little or no exercise, desk job - multiply your BMR by 1.2
    • active - light exercise/sports 1-3 days per week - multiply your BMR by 1.375
    • moderately active - exercise/sports 3-5 days per week - multiply your BMR by 1.55
    • heavy exercise - exercise/sports 6-7 days per week - multiply your BMR by 1.725

    As an example I'll use a BMR of 2000 x 1.55 = 3100 TDE.

    So depending on your goal you can know how much more/less you need to eat. If you plan to bulk add 500 calories/day and work from there; if you plan to cut then drop this by 300 and work from there.



    Bulking
    Eating Regime (using above example from calories section)
    1. Eat ~500 calories more than your TDEE. So using the above example 3100 + 500 = 3600 calories/day.
    2. Split that between 6 meals equally (so eating regularly i.e. every 3 hours.)
    3. Split those calories into the macronutrient ratio 40/40/20 P/C/F (for a bulk, different for cutting).
    • I.e. 3600 = 1440 (calories from protein), 1440 (carbs), 720 (fat).
    • 4 calories to each gram of protein/carb and 9 per gram of fat. So, 360g Protein/360g Carbs, 80g Fat per day.
    • Eat clean. Natural fats (fish oils, nuts etc), no processed foods. Small list: Chicken, eggs (whites and yolks), oats (plain), milk (whole, skimmed whatever to meet your caloric intake), wholewheat pasta/rice, olive oil.

    Gym Routine
    1. Lift big. So compound lifts: Squats, Bent-Over Rows, Bench Press (incline/decline/flat), Deadlifts, Barbell Overhead Presses. You focus on the compounds for 6 months you would gain a decent amount of mass all over.
    2. Keep the rep range between 5-8 for size. If you can do more, up the weight.
    3. Technique. If you cant perform a rep with perfect form lower the weight.
    4. Cardio twice a week to stay the fat. When bulking properly you will gain minimal fat. As you have a similar frame to me it shouldn't be too much of an issue.
    5. Workouts needn't be longer than 60 miniutes tops. After that you will start to use protein (i.e. muscle) for energy and in effect slow your progress. Unless of course you chug a high calorie protein/carb blend during your workout.

    Quick Summary
    - Eat big/clean. (I will add that you don't necessarily need to eat clean but it will minimise the fat gain and ultimately make you feel better in the gym).
    - Lift big (5-8 reps, high weight)
    - Sleep ~8 hours/day.
    - Be smart and don't overtrain. Very common when people first start working out as they are eager. It feels like the flu and you will be out of the gym anywhere from 1 week - month.



    Cutting/Losing Fat
    Eating Regime (using above example in calories section)
    1. Eat ~300 calories less than your TDEE. So 3100 - 300 = 2800 calories/day.
    2. Split that between 6 meals equally (so eating regularly i.e. every 3 hours.)
    It is perfectly possible to use the above macronutrient ratio and lose weight but I find that a lower number of carbs and more healthy fats work better.
    3. Split those calories into the macronutrient ratio 50/20/30 P/C/F
    • I.e. 2800 = 1400 (calories from protein), 560 (carbs), 840 (fat).
    • 4 calories to each gram of protein/carb and 9 per gram of fat. So, 350g Protein, 140g Carbs, 93g Fat per day.
    • Eat clean. Natural fats (fish oils, nuts etc), no processed foods. Small list: Chicken, eggs (whites and yolks), oats (plain), wholewheat pasta/rice, olive oil.
    4. Don't eat carbs within 3-4 hours of sleep.
    5. Eat carbs around your Pre/Post workout if possible.

    Gym Routine
    If I am honest you can maintain your bulking routine and simply add some cardio sessions. But I'll go into it further detail for those specifically looking to lose weight/tone. Also, performing big lifts for low reps is pretty hard if you lower your carbohydrate intake.

    1. Compound lifts.
    2. Keep the rep range between 10-15. If you can do more, up the weight.
    3. Technique. If you cant perform a rep with perfect form lower the weight.
    4. Cardio 3-5 times a week. I recommend 2 steady state and 3 HIIT sessions. (Notes to explain shortly).
    5. Workouts needn't be longer than 60 minutes tops.

    *NOTE* on cardio: HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training) is one of the most effective ways to burn fat. To summarise, you minimise the possibility of utilising muscle for energy and it raises your metabolism so you burn more calories of the course of the day not just in the gym. A simple HIIT program would be a 5 minute warm-up followed 2 minutes sprinting at full pace followed by a minute jogging. Repeated for 15 minutes, and then a 5 minute cool down. 5/2/1/2/1/2/1/2/1/2/5.


    Supplements
    1. Not necessary, but nonetheless useful.
    2. Protein powder: useful to meet your protein requirement as frankly eating that much in form of chicken etc/day is both expensive and exhausting. Buy protein with 90% protein count. Most products out there are ****e and full of sugar, most people go for big names. Don't do it. I have a site if you need one for the cleanest protein powder, and it's also cheaper. A few from here have used it.
    3. Creatine: Buy CEE not mono. Mono is nowhere near as effective and also causes bloat and is pretty tough on your kidneys. Simple CEE from GNC will do, again, no need for fancy brand ****e. Cycle it, so 2 months on 2 months off. I personall do 1 month on, 2 months off.
    4. BCAA's: DEFINITELY get some of these. They prevent your body from going into a catabolic state so you needn't fear that you are burning muscle for energy. Take first thing in morn with food, pre/post workout. The ONLY supplement I would say everyone would "NEED". It's natutal, found in meats but to get what you need you would need to eat an incredible amount of food.
    5. Fish Oils: Available from Hollands & Barrats cheap. But there are better out there. Another supplement that's extremely useful when dropping BF%.


    Misc
    - Take photo's/measurements and record them each month.
    - Have a workout log/diary so you can look back and see exactly what works and contributed towards your goals.
    - Don't sacrifice doing things you enjoy such having a session at the weekend. Moderation is the key, if 90% of your lifestyle is healthy it's not going to do any harm.
    - Sleep. Aim for 8 hours/day. This is when you actually build the muscle NOT when you are in the gym.
    - If you do compound lifts, hit the weights 3/4 times a week (not on concecutive days) and cardio twice.
    - If you don't have regular rest days (again when you actually build the muscle) you will become overtrained and actually lose muscle. Compounds regularly are taxing on CNS so you need rest.


    There are a few sections that I plan to add but I am knackered and this should cover most of what people were asking me.

    I'll be adding the following over the next few days.
    - FAQ.
    - Sample of a days food on a bulk/cut.
    - Recommended Routines.
    - Useful websites/books.
    - Recommended Supplements.
    - And Others.

    Anything posted that could help this thread I'll add to the front page, so those of you who wish to contribute please do so.

    Any questions, please post here and I'll answer them in this thread so that the information may help others. Or PM me if you wish.
     
  2. ohnoyellowdinosaur

    ohnoyellowdinosaur IncGamers Member

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    Re: Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

    or, better yet, lift weights as well. lifting weights is for women/oldpeople too!

    sorry if I'm derailing this, but have you read "Brains over Brawn: Manual of the human body" ?

    pretty good source for a basic understanding of nutrition (macro/micro nutriants, diets, etc.) and some basic exercise info

    edit: for anybody who wants to look into it, it's a free e-book which you can download as a pdf file
     
  3. BobCox2

    BobCox2 IncGamers Member

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    Re: Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

    I just listen to what me body tells me and respond.

    I eat about 1-2 meals a day and eat what I want out of what's available.

    But that's just me.

    I'm 50+ now still 6'1" tall about 150# Weight and vary by about 10# Weight either way and zero in height since age 16 or so and just do what I feel like.

    I'm a faster than normal walker and take the stairs at work and I have a 2 story house that I must race up and down 15-20 times a day (getting stuff for the wife) but that and sex is about it for cardio

    When I get to the doctors once every 2-3 years I'm told I have nice blood pressure and all the blood tests come back fine.

    Good genes help a lot (most of my Family hits 80s - 100+s).

    You have to look a family history IMHO and adjust based on that.


    I just started any and all debate in this thread

    Sorry if yours sucks and your gonna die young most likely but hey we all die way to soon.

    I think you should take the amount you can do based on family history into account and spend a amount of time on it that gives you pleasure, because we all have only so long and should enjoy it as best we can.

    As for myself I have better things to spend my time on than obsessing over working out.

    Considering that Colonel Colt made us all equal when it comes to enforcing your opinion via physical force that is.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2010
  4. nurman

    nurman IncGamers Member

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    Re: Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

    inb4 Zumba
     
  5. stillman

    stillman IncGamers Member

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    Re: Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

    Deepstrike, would you be able to put your numbers in pounds or kilograms?

    There is something vital I did not see in your OP: expectations. Acording to someone I won't mention right now, if you do everything perfectly and have perfect nutrition, you CAN ONLY EXPECT TO GAIN 5 POUNDS OF MUSCLE IN ONE YEAR. If you happen to be fortunate with genetics, it is possible to boost that to 10 pounds, but don't count on being lucky. This is of course, assuming you do not use anabolic steroids.

    5 pounds is not much after a years work. It takes many years to aquire the amount of muscle mass most trainers would like. Any other mass gains you make on top of the 5-10 pounds per year is going to be fat.

    I think you should also stress that your 6 meals a day should have the protein in them (30grams if you weigh 180 pounds). You cannot just lump all your protein into a meal or two; it MUST be spread out over your six meals since we need a constant supply of protein.

    And what about not working the same muscle group two days in a row? This is important because you would just be breaking down the protein reinforcement your body is trying to put into the muscles. This takes a few days, so the arms, for example, should not be worked day after day. It is the helaing of the microlesions that causes the muscles to get bigger.

    Also, the "lift big" advice might lead to problems. Does this imply a not-so-gradual approach? Because if the routine becomes dreadfully stressful, people dreading their routine every day (working out 5-7 days of the week) is going to discourage them from weight lifting for decades, which is what they should be doing, since that's how long it takes.

    Maybe do a section on getting motivated? And most importantly, how to avoid injury. And how about a section on common mistakes? You see videos of people with stick-thin arms putting as much weight on the bar as they can so they can do this ONE ALMIGHTY BENCH PRESS. That way, they can brag that they can press 210 pounds. But how many reps are they doing? One, barley. That sucks, and more reps is what leads to more sarcoplasmic hypertrophy. The one rep max lifts are not ideal for gains.

    You may have mentioned some of this, but I was in a hurry and cannot read it through slowly atm. I'm just saying some things are crucial.

    Edit: BobCox, a colt won't get you laid though, dude. Well, what I mean is, being more fit will grant males more selection.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2010
  6. Leopold Stotch

    Leopold Stotch IncGamers Member

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    Re: Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

    i am not an expert, but some advice i picked up from kineseology teachers, majors, and people who work out regularly and i've worked out with when i did work out... >.>

    go to the gym with a buddy. have him/her be your... lookout? i can't remember the word. SPOTTER! yeah, have them be your spotter when lifting weights. they can make sure you are safe if you're doing bench presses and can correct you if you happen to be making a mistake.

    gym buddies are also good motivation and (at least for me) makes the process of going to the gym much more fun and easier. i have someone to talk to and im not by myself so i know i'll be safe from some man who's trippin' on steroids and wants to rape me and kill me because he has roid rage or something. >.> (sorry, OP, im weird and overly paranoid. <.<) it just makes me feel safer and more comfortable having a friend at the gym, ya know?

    motivation can be anything from a reunion to a wedding to just not fitting into your clothes anymore. i used to be 30 lbs. heavier and i know that does not sound like a lot, but because im small in stature, it was a huge difference for me. i went up two pant-sizes (i cried on that day), people who had not seen me in a while ("while" being a six months to a year) thought i was pregnant (i cried those nights as well) and the sucky thing was my weight gain could not have been helped. i was on medication that made me gain weight and that could not have been stopped, ya know? so, i tried to eat better and worked out a bit with an ex. sadly, the ex-bf did not want to wake up in the mornings which was the only time i could work out b/w work and school, so i had to go by myself to the gym and i lost motivation. so i tried little things to help me out: eating healthier, drinking tons of water, parking farther away from my classes so i could walk more. i may not have lost a lot of weight (if any), but you know what? every little bit helps. you gotta not only try to make peace with your physical appearance, but emotionally and mentally as well.

    a friend of mine and Mara's is giving us karate lessons and for part of our warm-up, we have to do crunches. one thing i noticed that some people do is the curl their neck. don't. it puts a lot of strain on your neck and is not good for you. instead, lay flat on the ground, hands around your head. when you lift up, think of it was raising your chin and chest to the ceiling. you should feel it in your stomach and when you do, you're doing it right. if you're doing sit-ups, don't curl your neck, keep your back straight, come all the way up. if doing with your spouse, a reward to making it all the way up can be a kiss. :D (sorry, but sometimes, you gotta get creative and give little rewards, ya know? i guess with a friend, you can do a high five or something, lol) pilates works REALLY well too; works muscles you didn't even know you had.

    (someone can correct me on this part) reps. i think it's the more you do, the faster you do it, but with less weight. and by faster, im talking at a faster and correct pace. more weight, less you do and you take it slower, breathing regularly while lifting. again, im no expert or anything. im just recalling things i picked up over the years from classes and numerous people. sorry for the wall of text. >.>


     
  7. TheOgreMan

    TheOgreMan IncGamers Member

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    Re: Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

    This is absolutely not true. You can reasonably expect to gain a lot more muscle mass in a year, especially if you are a "novice" weightlifter. I've just restarted lifting 5 weeks ago and have already gained 5lbs of mass. Rest assured that it is not fat; I've lost a bit of fat so I've probably put on more than 5lbs of muscle.

    @OP: Bent-over rows are cool and all, but I think that pendlay rows are better overall. Anyone who wants to really start to bulk up and build good, overall body strength would do well to read Mark Rippetoe's Starting Strength. His system is proven, solid, and doesn't require a huge time investment. You are basically in and out of the gym in 40-50 minutes 3 days a week.

    One thing that you don't mention, which is pretty important, is that if you want to "bulk up" then eating that amount of calories in good food is very difficult, especially at first. Yeah, it's incredibly easy to eat 3500 calories a day going to Hardee's or eating pizza...but eating wholesome foods makes it a LOT harder.



     
  8. Mikachu

    Mikachu IncGamers Member

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    Re: Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

    A lot of people talk about losing weight, my issue is gaining weight.
    Last year I weighed in at ** pounds thereabout, and was about (converting metric) 5"2 or so. I had to gain muscle. To eat GOOD food is, as Ogre says, extremely difficult. In a year I'm now kinda muscular....erm yeah! OK not really :p

    My advice is also eat three meals a day and no snacking (healthy snacks are ok :p). Getting yourself into a routine is a must, but it shouldn't be rediculously controlled. I had an issue with exercise being underweight and fatigued, but making it out once or twice a week at least never did any harm.
    >.> :D
     
  9. nadenitza

    nadenitza Banned

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    Re: Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

    Gym and weights are good but you need fresh air too. Very good for the muscle. At my uni we got over 3 kilometer area with bars, bent metal ladders with hanging poles, benches, traps, trenches, a lot of this [dunno how it's spelled in english : ) ] and that kind of stuff. I'ts kind of a military school but there are civilian students too.

    Bar training is good you can train your whole body while weights are more good for a specific muscle group. Our gym there is quite wrecked but you can still manage the basic things ; ) I use the gym only for weight push ups and back-muscles training, some leg exercice, stomach muscle on bench really basic stuff. Bar training is what i like the most and home training - at home with two dump-bells you can do miracles, push-ups are great too, really whatever comes to your mind - you can experiment ; )

    Bout the calories... i got to say you need energy if you plan on training so eating is good. What you need mainly is meat and vegies. Speccialy for bar training you gotta keep fed and wait 1-2 hours for the food to make you zstrongar!211 : ) and don't forget to take some water couse it's pain without.... bout 500ml minimum.

    Well thats what i wanted to say : ) i trained here and there before uni but nothing special. Once i got there something snapped in my head i started more seriously... i mainly train for good health and to help people if needed be in bad situations ; ) But whatever you do no matter bars or weights or both - if you train regulary and keep self disciple you will only gain from your efforts! ; )
     
  10. stillman

    stillman IncGamers Member

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    Re: Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

    Ogre, the only way to be sure about that is to goto a clinic, or there are ways of measuring body fat percentage yourself, but it's tricky and sketchy. You need to do a lot of measurements.

    The only exceptions where you gain more muscle than 10 pounds per year is when people use steroids, or teenagers growing bigger and taller with or without the weight lifting, etc. I stick by this, but we'll see what Deepstrike has to say.

    So many issues. I can tell I'll be posting a lot here! Another good thing to do if you find the bent over row awkward is wide grip pull ups which are great for the lats.

    One other issue I find strange is people keep dedicating themselves to time frames like 'six months' or what have you. What are they preparing for, a date or a single night out on the town? It's all for nothing if you just stop after that and start losing the muscle. All that work, then imagine starting over again knowing you already did all this but have to start with lower weight again. People should really be doing this for life. A lot of elderly patients I've worked with are basically jellied mush draped losely over a weak skeleton; don't let it happen to you! People can still lift weights (reasonably) right up into their senior years. They just don't want to.
     
  11. KrimLjubljana

    KrimLjubljana Banned

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    Re: Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

    I want to use heavy weights for increased hypertrofi. I already eat enough as I gain about ~0.5-1 kg (1-2 pounds) pr. week in mass, however I want to use weights to encourage this mass to be muscle mass.

    Anyway, I want to use weights most optimal, I'm not going to use various machines that locks the movement into one given direction, not requiring any balance and thereby going to be a long term danger for when I'm going to require said balance.

    So I'm basicly going for dumbells, barbells, body weight (dips and chinups) and cables, however the excersizes using these things requires that you know the technique for doing the excersizes, otherwise you get a high risk of injurying yourself by putting high pressure at the wrong spots, etc.

    So my problem is that eventhough I can find instructions and videos on how to perform these excersizes, every single place highly recommends to get someone experienced to check out if the lift is actually done correctly. Though getting this seems very hard. I've no quality guarantee at all, people who're hired often aren't experienced, rather the centers simply need some people to be there for them and then they're called instructors for that reason solely, not because of any educational background. Likewise, asking people at random is very unlikely to find me someone who actually knows what they're doing. Finally for those I've asked, many even said I was too skinny to do these excersizes (which only proves that they clearly weren't professionals, you can't be too skinny to a given excersize, but you can be too weak (or to put it polite, not strong enough) to not be able to do a given excersize with a given weigth).

    So what should I do? How can I be confident in knowing the techniques and doing the excersizes, such as squat, deadlift, military presses, benchpress, etc. when I've no way to ensure quality of people to check up on if I do the different lifts correct in the first place? Even the instruction sites with video and detalied instructions still highly recommends someone to check if you do it correct after all.

    Please help, I'm stuck, I can offer you certain arousing pleasures in return for help, thank you.
     
  12. BobCox2

    BobCox2 IncGamers Member

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    Re: Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

    Remember my Motto

    "No Pain, Hey no Pain!"

    Works for me, if it hurts I stop doing it.
     
  13. TheOgreMan

    TheOgreMan IncGamers Member

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    Re: Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

    You would be surprised at how amazingly helpful a lot of people are in gyms. If you want a trainer then looking for a certified trainer with a degree in fitness and/or years of experience will help...but will also cost you more. To get back at helpful people, a lot of the guys (occasionally girls) you find working out in gyms know a lot about what they are doing: technique, reps, etc.

    Go to the gym with a good idea of what you want to be doing. Have a plan, know what lifts you want to do, how many of each, and how long it should take you. If you are at all unsure about how to do an exercise then just ask someone who is there. Most of the time people take small breaks (60-90 secs) between major lifts and are more than happy to give you tips on form and whatnot while they spot you. You might think that built dude who looks like he can rip an engine out of a car looks mean and unhelpful, but most of the time they are happy to help. Just ask.

    stillman: still going by what I said. You can gain well over 10lbs a year of pure muscle mass without steroids or drugs of any sort. A good diet and great lifting plan is all it takes. After you are in rather good shape then you probably can't put on more than 5lbs a year, but by that point it doesn't matter since you are in good shape.



     
  14. KrimLjubljana

    KrimLjubljana Banned

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    Re: Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

    It's true people are generally nice and it's not hard to get someone to show me a given excersize. However it only shows how they think it should be performed and I've no way of guaranteeing the quality of their suggestions, except from what I've on the net, which in that case doesn't bode well.

    Let's just take squat and benchpress. I've seen so called people with education showing me benchpress by first putting their legs on the place where you lie and the same people showing squat where their knees are going way beyond their feet.

    I'm sure I could get mr. random to show me how he'd do any excersize with pleasure, but it's my body and I need to be certain that it's shown right.

    It's much easier when looking on the internet, because I can look up on people, I can find their arguments and I can do the calculations and see what parts of the body is pressured, etc. However I cannot see myself from all the right angles, etc. when I do the lifts myself and I cannot be sure I haven't forgotten something important before the habit of doing the lift is there.
    I'd really love a competent spotter, or at least someone competent to check if I do the excersize correct, but how can I've a gurantee of their competens? Last time I spend about 100 euro on some "pro" guy who clearly had no clue on what he was doing and when I tried to ask into it, he took offense and ended up saying I was too skinny to even do these kind of excersizes. Could I get my money back? No, apperently, I don't pay for quality, I only pay for his random advice.
     
  15. stillman

    stillman IncGamers Member

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    Re: Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

    ^ here is a link to the person I trust and have found very helpful:
    http://scoobysworkshop.com/gainingMuscle.htm

    Ogre, that link is for you too (scroll down a bit), because this guy says, well, you know.

    He is an engineer in his 50's and has 20 plus years of body building experience. He is not out to sell anything and just wants to give back to bodybuilding after all it has done for him. His info comes from various books on the subject.

    Krim, I found that as long as you don't try to put too much weight on the bar, and if you follow the instructions on proper form, it's pretty hard to injure yourself. Start off by using just the bar with no weight and add weights gradually until you can only lift 8-16 or whatever is recommended. Don't be a show off, basically. If you are suspicous of instructional videos online, then it may help to watch many of them about the same exercise. If all the instructors are telling you the same things in their videos, that's a good sign. Also read the comments below the video, because potentially thousands of people are watching to analyze and nag about anything that is wrong.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2010
  16. TheOgreMan

    TheOgreMan IncGamers Member

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    Re: Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

    A lot of the difference you are seeing with people doing different things in lifting is just a variation of a lift. Take your squat example: a "standard" squat is simply feet slightly more than shoulder width apart, back in a normal curvature throughout the lift, legs go down until the top of your thigh is parallel to the ground. Some people will do olympic squats where their feet are much wider apart. Others do AtG squats (*** to ground) where they basically sit on the floor before coming back up. It's all really the same lift, just varying degrees. Learning the terminology will be very helpful so you can just ask someone to spot you for a "standard squat" or a "normal bench press".



     
  17. HumanTyphoon

    HumanTyphoon IncGamers Member

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    Re: Gym, Fitness and Nutrition Thread - With FAQ

    Make sure you are consuming enough protein. The recommended daily intake of protein should be 1 gram/lb of lean muscle. (Total Weight in lbs)-((Total Weight in lbs)*(% Body Fat)= (Grams of Protein/Day)


    For exercises like squats, deadlifts, and the sort, it would be best to have a personal trainer guide you through the motions. Injuries often arise from improper form. However, those "instructors" in the gym probably know enough to get you started.

    What is your final goal? Are you just trying to get fit or eventually end up competing in Mr. Olympia? lmk!


     

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