ermm strangeness

shay

Diabloii.Net Member
ermm strangeness

yes.. this can only be about strangeness... sooo why cant the grasss be pink or blue???
 

Damotta

Diabloii.Net Member
Grass and most other plants are green because they contain a pigment
known as chlorophyll. The chlorophyll is used in the process of
photosynthesis where a plant produces sugar in the presence of
sunlight. In fact the word 'photosynthesis' means literally to
synthesize or 'make' from light (photo). There are, of course some
plants which do not contain chlorophyll, and these generally get their
nutrition (food) by other means. Some examples are the fungi which
decompose dead, and sometimes living, tissue, for their food.
You will find that a green plant needs light to make food. If the
source of light is cut off, the plant dies. Mushrooms, which are
fungi, do not require light to make food (they decompose matter
as I mentioned above) and you can find mushrooms growing in almost
total darkness.

The process of photosynthesis is described in great detail in many
science books. It is really the process by which life as we know it
is able to continue and renew itself.
(source)

&

why is anything any color at all? In the last Science Theatre column on why snow is white, we said that the light we see things with from the sun, from our light bulbs is called white light and can be broken down into the colors in the rainbow in order of their wavelengths.

The snow is white because all the colors are reflected and refracted equally without any color range dominating.

This is not so when white light hits objects which we don’t see as white or gray.

Most objects tend to reflect only some of the light falling on them. The light contains all of the colors, but the objects reflects selected colors and absorbs the rest.

This is called "subtractive color mixing" because some of the colors are subtracted out of the light.

Grass appears green because all of the colors in the rainbow are absorbed into the leaves of the grass except green.
(source)

happy?
 

Stevinator

Diabloii.Net Member
but why green? did the high plant council just up and decide to be sunlight bigots and outlaw the absorbtion of green?

seems kinda arbitrary.
 

Damotta

Diabloii.Net Member
Stevinator said:
but why green? did the high plant council just up and decide to be sunlight bigots and outlaw the absorbtion of green?

seems kinda arbitrary.
I don't know enough about biology to answer that question. I know I've heard the answer before in one of my many biology classes in the past, but biology was never a subject of interest for me.

I'm sure you can find the answer somewhere on the Internet.
 

Stevinator

Diabloii.Net Member
biology can explain the "how" plants appear green but not the "why" green and not another color. since we're all about the esoteric discussions, i figured, why not ask?
 

piff

Diabloii.Net Member
Plants aren't green. They are magenta. They just reflect all of the green light that hits them and they absorb the rest. That's why they appear green.
 

shay

Diabloii.Net Member
.... magenta.. wow i feel i am actually learning.. but the feeling shall leave in oh sayyyy... oh its gone.
 

SuggestiveName

Diabloii.Net Member
I just finished a philosophy senior seminar called "Color and Consciousness" and according to the best color science and psychology many philosophers believe that the world is not actually colored, or if you want a physical explanation it is going to be so gerrymandered and complex that it's almost useless. If you are curious google up Lawrence Hardin or Alex Byrne. I will warn you, it's pretty dense stuff full of both difficult science and heavy contempory philosophical jargon.

The conclusion I think I've decided on after dealing with this for a semester is that colors are products of our perceptual systems, objects are not colored as such but are simply the arbitrary product of evolution of visual systems in a carbon-based world with a certain light spectrum from the sun. Trying to explain colors physically will result in a system that is uselessly arbitrary, but at the end of the day it doesn't matter much since we all have similar enough perceptual systems to make color judgements useful and indeed often beautiful. The fact that they are primarily illusory is troublesome only when wearing your philosophers hat.
 
Yes, it is only a frequency of radiation. Or is it even that? :)...

------------

some other site said:
Grass is green because it is envious of trees which are much taller and don't get stepped on like grass does.
------------

Stevinator said:
but why green? did the high plant council just up and decide to be sunlight bigots and outlaw the absorbtion of green?
Good question.

Damotta said:
I'm sure you can find the answer somewhere on the Internet.
Indeed:

see link below said:
Grass and other green plants have a chemical called chlorophyll (KLOR-oh-fill), and its special structure allows it to specifically catch blue and red light. All light has energy, and chlorophyll absorbs the colors that have the correct energy to help power the plant’s machinery. The plant can then turn carbon dioxide and water into glucose, a sugar. The leftover light, mostly green, bounces off and reaches our eyes; since there’s a lot of chlorophyll in plants, we see them as being green.
source
 
Top