Edgar Allan Poe

th5418

Banned
Edgar Allan Poe

Anyone ever read "The Cask Of Amontillado"? I have to read it for english and I have no idea what it is talking asbout. Did he bury the guy in there alive for revenge or something?
 

Yaboosh

Diabloii.Net Member
With literary analysis, use your imagination. Come up with a thesis for what it means, NO MATTER HOW MESSED UP, and then support it with the work. Teachers seem to love creativity that can be supported.
 
If you want to read something scary, look up the biography of Edgar. He was one mentally unhinged, paranoid dude, and it's a wonder he lived as long as he did.
 

ZeppelinAngel

Diabloii.Net Member
i remember this story being confusing.. i read it in like 9th grade honors english.. well.. part of it that is.. the rest i just sorta.. skipped

didn't he write Bells Bells Bells? if so that was just annoying

i started to memorize the raven, because it's my favorite poem, but i didn't keep it up, i memorized the first two.. parts.. (can't remember the actual word for it), then i like forgot that i was trying to memorize it or something.. and i never got any farther
 

Choogy

Diabloii.Net Member
"Quoth the raven, 'Nevermore!'"

He's just gettin rid of a business rival...they were equals of a sort and one insulted the other...
 

AeroJonesy

Diabloii.Net Member
Was there a big revenge theme in this? It's been awhile since I've read the story, but I recall him plotting the perfect revenge or something. Maybe I'm just thinking of the Count of Monte Cristo.
 

th5418

Banned
Can someone name 3 ironies about it? I found one, its that montresor keeps a friendly face but then kills fortunato
 

maccool

Diabloii.Net Member
th5418 said:
Did he bury the guy in there alive for revenge or something?
No. Practice.

I will refrain from mocking you for being so lazy you ask an obvious question in the OTF instead of a) reading the story and thinking about it for yourself; or b) reading the story yourself and then thinking about it. It's not like it's a difficult or long story; nor does it have any particular deep meaning.

This is becoming a disturbing trend.
 

My_Immortal6

Diabloii.Net Member
Zep, the paragraphs in poetry are called Stanzas.

Edgar Allen Poe is one of my favourite authors, I am currently going through a collection of his short stories. Good stuff.
 

Corneo

Diabloii.Net Member
Hahah. I wrote an essay on Cask of Amontillado for my English college class last quarter.

3 ironies huh?
1. Fortunato's name implies he is a fortunate person, that is not the case.
2. Irony how the reader knows the faith of Fortunato, but Fortunato does not know his faith. There is a special name to this irony, I think it is called situation irony, but don't quote me I am a miserable English student.
3. Fortunato coughs for a long time, then says the cough will not keep him, Montressor agrees because he knows that he will kill Fortunato.
 
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