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College and the USMC

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Yaboosh, Mar 13, 2004.

  1. Yaboosh

    Yaboosh IncGamers Member

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    College and the USMC

    Well, I am nearing the end of my collegiate journey, and I have become increasingly worried about my post-uni life. Since I was in my first year, I was planning on joining a police department upon graduation. Recently, I have decided that, for various reasons, a big one being the divorce rate, I do not want to be a cop. I have turned my attention to the armed forces, and the Marines specifically.

    I have briefly reviewed their website, and have noticed the Officer Training they offer. 10 weeks in the summer and you become a Second Liutenant upon completion, an officer.

    How is this program? I am not worried about how taxing it is, I fully expect it to be so.

    How is life in the Marines? I do not want my life to be all about my work. Family is very important to me and I want them to be my main priority. Is the divorce rate in the Armed forces as horribly wretched as it is in police departments across the country? Basically what I am saying, is that I do NOT want my job affecting the happiness and relationship I have with my family as being a cop would do.

    Sarge, you got any advice for me?

    I am currently a 20 year old male nearing the end of his 3rd year at Florida State University. I am nearing completion of a bachelors degree in Criminology. Thanks for any advice any of you armed forces people can offer.
     
  2. Module88

    Module88 IncGamers Member

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    If you care about staying with your family, don't go into the military. They have high divorce rates (probably higher than police officers do) and have a much greater chance of being sent far away for long periods of time. Often this is the reason for divorce, and if you are a family man, I wouldn't recommend it.
     
  3. Yaboosh

    Yaboosh IncGamers Member

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    This is what I wanted to know. Grazi.
     
  4. Geeno

    Geeno IncGamers Member

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    If youre squeaky clean you could go FBI, I dont know about their divorce rate though. Or what about Coast Guard with your swimming ability it would be nothin.
     
  5. VampiroXIII

    VampiroXIII IncGamers Member

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    Divorce rate here in Camp Pendleton is so common, there is a class held every week on how to actually go about getting one. And it is always full. Module is right about the family thing too. 6-month minimum deployments are very taxing on families.

    To answer your question about becoming an officer, since you would already have your degree, you would only go to Officer Candidate School. I couldn't tell you much about that because all of the officer programs I have looked into involved getting your degree while you went though the program.
     
  6. Sergeant

    Sergeant IncGamers Member

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    Don't act like going int he military means the end of your family. While it's true being a military spouse means being understanding, patient and learning to be a single parent (essentially) when the breadwinner is away on a 6 month deployment.

    Boosh, it is entirely possible and doable to be a military officer and have a perfectly healthy family. They simply need to understand the sacrifices all parties will have to make.

    Life in the Marines depends largely on your assignment first and job second. If I were to want to get married and have a family, I wouldn't go infantry. It's too demanding for most families. If you went comm, supply, planning and other non-infantry jobs, you stand a better chance of getting assignments that will keep you stateside.

    Now, as a Marine, you can probably expect deployments, especially if this is going to be your career and given the current state of affairs in the world. However, if you stay involved in your assignments, stay on top of your schooling and career progression, you can have more control over where you go than most know or would like to believe.

    So, life in the Marines is good so long as you don't leave your fortunes to the whims of the Marines. Stay involved in your career and in the process of getting assignments. Keep your family involved in it all. Let them know what to expect and how things are so they are just as informed as you are. The best way to ensure your family stays together amid the many times you might not be there is to keep them informed and prepare them to hold the fort down while you're not there. It is hard on many families but I'm willing to bet much of it could be prevented if there was more preparation and communication.

    Life in the Marines is very rewarding and fulfilling so long as you realize you and your family will make sacrifices so that you can continue to serve your country. I mean, with your degree, you could even be a military police officer (commissioned) or an investigator, something along those lines. Those types of jobs will keep you stateside more than most because you will usually be assigned to a base or station rather than a unit who's based there. At a base level assignment, the chances of deployment are much less likely than with a unit level assignment. Headquarters, base and other such assignments will keep you in the states more than others.

    Also, assignments like independent duty (active duty serving at a reserve station), recruiting duty (time consuming but stateside), drill duty and so on. While drill duty and recruiting duty are stateside assignments, they are time consuming and just as hard (if not harder) as being deployed.

    Bottom line is being in the military is demanding on the whole family, not just the person serving. When someone serves in the military, the whole family serves. It can be made easier on those staying home if they are informed, prepared and kept a part of your career. If you were to spend 20 yeas in and then retire, you can plan on several years (in total, more than one) worth of deployments and exercises.

    I can't speak from personal experience because I've not been married long so we haven't experienced the hardships of military life together. It's always juyst been me I had to worry about and that's pretty easy to deal with. However, I have had many close, personal friends who have been on both ends of the spectrum. Those who have divorced and fallen apart from the military and those who survive and flourish inspite of and because of it. It all comes down to making your family a part of your career and preparing them for the times you won't be there, making sure they're connected to friends and military family support groups who will make your absence easier to manage.

    Let me know if you want more info, I'm happy to help.
     

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