Col. David H. Hackworth, 1930-2005

llad12

Diabloii.Net Member
Col. David H. Hackworth, 1930-2005

NEW YORK, May 5 /PRNewswire/ -- Col. David H. Hackworth, the United States Army's legendary, highly decorated guerrilla fighter and lifelong champion of the doughboy and dogface, groundpounder and grunt, died Wednesday in Mexico. He was 74 years old. The cause of death was a form of cancer now appearing with increasing frequency among Vietnam veterans exposed to the defoliants called Agents Orange and Blue.

Col. Hackworth spent more than half a century on the country's hottest battlefields, first as a soldier, then as a writer, war correspondent and sharp-eyed critic of the Military Industrial Complex and ticket-punching generals he dismissed as Perfumed Princes. He preferred the combat style of World War II and Korean War heroes like James Gavin and Matthew Ridgeway and, during Vietnam, of Hank "The Gunfighter" Emerson and Hal Moore. General Moore, the author of "We Were Soldiers Once and Young," called him "the Patton of Vietnam" and General Creighton Abrams, the last American commander in that disastrous war, described him as "the best battalion commander I ever saw in the United States Army."

Col. Hackworth's battlefield exploits put him on the line of American military heroes squarely next to Sgt. York and Audie Murphy. The novelist Ward Just, who knew him for forty years, described him as "the genuine article, a soldier's soldier, a connoisseur of combat." At 14, as World War II was sputtering out, he lied about his age to join the Merchant Marine, and at 15 he enlisted in the U.S. Army. Over the next 26 years he spent fully seven in combat. He was put in for the Medal of Honor three times; the last application is currently under review at the Pentagon. He was twice awarded the Army's second highest honor for valor, the Distinguished Service Cross, along with 10 Silver Stars and 8 Bronze Stars. When asked about his many awards, he always said he was proudest of his 8 Purple Hearts and his Combat Infantryman's Badge.

A reputation won on the battlefield made it impossible to dismiss him when he went on the attack later as a critic of careerism and incompetence in the military high command. In 1971, he appeared in the field on ABC's Issue and Answers to say Vietnam "is a bad war...it can't be won. We need to get out." He also predicted that Saigon would fall to the North Vietnamese within four years, a prediction that turned out to be far more accurate than anything the Joint Chiefs of Staff were telling President Nixon or that the President was telling the American people.
P R Newswire

A patriot, legendary soldier, and outspoken watch-dog for the military is gone.

Although sometimes controversial, the "Hack" always looked out for the ordinary soldier first and foremost. SFTT

Services are pending in Arlington

He will be missed.

RIP
 

Necrolestes

Diabloii.Net Member
Soldier for peace

A man of courage, by anyone's standards. He stood up for what he knew would be unpopular but he stood by it because it was what he felt was right. The US needs more men like him and less men like Tom DeLay and Donald Rumsfeld.
 

llad12

Diabloii.Net Member
To the end, colonel a man of the troops

WASHINGTON -- His courage under fire was the stuff of Hollywood, such as once ordering his helicopter pilot to land in the middle of a firefight so he could rescue his wounded men.

As an orphan shining shoes at a military base in Santa Monica, Calif., he lied about his age to join up in the waning days of World War II. That started a career that led him to Korea, where he survived a gunshot to the head, and a whopping four tours of duty in Vietnam, where his daring and swagger became the inspiration for Robert Duvall's Colonel Kilgore character in the movie ''Apocalypse Now."

Tomorrow, the US military will lay to rest Colonel David H. Hackworth -- among its most decorated heroes of all time -- at Arlington National Cemetery.

The top brass is not expected to attend ...
Boston Globe
 

CyberHawk

Diabloii.Net Member
Thanks for the read fellas...always good to learn about such heros as Hackworth. :thumbsup:
RIP.
 

Geeno

Diabloii.Net Member
I dont mean to turn this into a debate.

But my dad got that ****ing cancer from agent orange. He said he could remember the guys who sprayed it laughing as they soaked the troops.

Some vets have been reimbursed for medical bills and etc as a result of this cancer, other illnesses.

So we send my dads military records including pictures of him in vietnam and sworn testimony from people who knew him..


Know what they said? Tough, we dont have enough proof that you were in viet nam, despite all the records, pictures and witnesses. So go **** yourself.


Thats why i hate the government.
 

jmervyn

Diabloii.Net Member
Geeno said:
Thats why i hate the government.
You shouldn't hate the Gov't - simple non-partisan distrust is more than sufficient. When an organization is designed to achieve mediocrity and bureaucracy, you should not be surprised when it does both.

I've been writing letters to try to get my Father-in-Law the Silver Star he was recommended for (as a field medic who survived the entire Merrill's Marauders campaign in Burma). Sadly, the way to get results is to find a patron with influence, rather than process the paperwork correctly.

As for my mild Gulf War symptoms, they curtly informed me that I was not suffering from exposure to Agent Orange. Guess I was around 5 years old during my 'Nam tour...

I love the line on the second post by Ill. RIP, Colonel. You will be missed.
 

DaviddeJong

Diabloii.Net Member
jmervyn said:
As for my mild Gulf War symptoms, they curtly informed me that I was not suffering from exposure to Agent Orange. Guess I was around 5 years old during my 'Nam tour...
hehe...

The doctors told me that the battle for hill 341 was all in my head. They didn't want to declare me insane, now I have to work for a living! They so picky, I guess you had to be there to be traumatised; but after all the movies I've watched, I think I should qualify too.

Don't you think?

David.
 

Geeno

Diabloii.Net Member
Well you Gulf War guys are in for it all the same. When youre around 50 expect all your old buddies to start droppin like flies.
 

jmervyn

Diabloii.Net Member
Geeno said:
Well you Gulf War guys are in for it all the same. When youre around 50 expect all your old buddies to start droppin like flies.
It actually has already begun. Perhaps that's why I take such exception to people claiming that Saddam had no WMD... perhaps I was downwind of the destruction of a fruit salad stockpile?

However, the watch-phrase I've grown used to is stress, i.e. "You're not sick, you're crazy." Great way to malign both the troops and the issue, with an eye towards trying to fake Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Stress my arse, I had more stress in garrison, or in my current job, than we did during 75% of our 'desert field exercise'.

Again, Hack will be missed, because he was kind of like Ralph Nader when it came to examining this BS. Certainly not always right, but definitely doing the right thing.
 
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