Another victory for freedom!

jmervyn

Diabloii.Net Member
Another victory for freedom!

No, this isn't a Shrub-fest.

Wired Article said:
I know not many of you are interested in things like Linux, but this failure by big business to impose their will through EU regulation means that competition and invention will still be possible in Europe without needing a lawyer suckling at your wallet.

And note - it isn't just PC software, but any software. Like mobile phones, PDA's, DVR's, whatever. Probably cars.
 

Kawaii

Diabloii.Net Member
Maybe they bought them to get rid of them.

Edit: After reading the article, maybe not.
 

DrunkPotHead

Diabloii.Net Member

DurfBarian

Diabloii.Net Member
Good decision by the Europeans. :thumbsup: Hope it doesn't lead to a business exodus on any scale.
 
jmervyn said:
No, this isn't a Shrub-fest.



I know not many of you are interested in things like Linux, but this failure by big business to impose their will through EU regulation means that competition and invention will still be possible in Europe without needing a lawyer suckling at your wallet.

And note - it isn't just PC software, but any software. Like mobile phones, PDA's, DVR's, whatever. Probably cars.
For the record, my understanding of the patents CII Directive was that it would not have any impact on PC software--it was only for software developed for things like the computer chips in your car transmission or in your washing machine, and would have allowed for individuals who wrote such software to patent it to prevent M$FT from reverse-engineering it and recreating it, thus using their media machines to reap the benefits of someone else's work.
 

jmervyn

Diabloii.Net Member
DrunkCajun said:
For the record, my understanding of the patents CII Directive was that it would not have any impact on PC software--it was only for software developed for things like the computer chips in your car transmission or in your washing machine, and would have allowed for individuals who wrote such software to patent it to prevent M$FT from reverse-engineering it and recreating it, thus using their media machines to reap the benefits of someone else's work.
And I've heard quite the opposite, though couched in the most admirable language possible. Truth be told, it sounded like a thoroughly loophole-ridden piece of legislation from the onset. Having the "leadership" try to force it down the members' throats certainly helped cause this rejection.
 

jmervyn

Diabloii.Net Member
Here's a follow-up article:
http://www.linuxpipeline.com/showArticle.jhtml?articleId=165700305

There's also a nice editorial, which hasn't been posted yet:
LXP said:
Editor's Note: The EU Says NO

As a professional cynic, I always get suspicious when there's too much good news to report. Are things really looking up, or is the great cosmic joke preparing to slap me upside the head with an antidote to the sunshine-and-puppy overdose? Worse yet, did a speck of optimism somehow pollute the ice water pulsing through my veins?

Anything is possible -- and since I'm still punch-drunk on a heady elixir of Karl Rove schadenfreude and 14 cups of coffee, I'll just roll with it.

If you're an EU citizen, or if you just enjoy seeing greedy weasels get their just desserts, then one piece of good news truly stands out. Last week, the EU Parliament voted -- by a crazy lopsided margin, I should add -- to kill a stupid, short-sighted plan to turn Europe's software industry into a full-employment program for intellectual-property lawyers.

Frankly, I was mystified by some of the U.S. news headlines on stories covering this vote. Many of them said things like, "EU Parliament Defeats Patent Reform," making the whole affair sound like a bunch of legislative nincompoops mindlessly flinging themselves into the path of oncoming Progress.

Perhaps this is understandable, since the U.S. news media usually does cover a bunch of legislative nincompoops. Consider, for example, the Texas congressman and would-be scourge of municipal Wi-Fi projects who represents just one of several wholly owned-and-operated SBC subsidiaries in the Lone Star state.

Anyway, just to set the record straight: The recently-deceased EU patent proposal only qualified as "reform" if you relished the idea of Microsoft's attorneys descending on European patent offices as if they were re-enacting the final scene in "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad, World." Only this time, instead of Mel Brooks and Zero Mostel, we get a horde of shysters snatching enough patents to sue half of Europe's IT industry back to the Stone Age and to put the other half there through licensing-fee induced penury.

Would Microsoft and other firms have done such a thing? No -- but even the prospect would have made lesser outrages seem tame by comparison. Is anyone here ready to take the "one-click shopping" patent fight to Europe for its 2006 reunion tour? I didn't think so.

In the end, the vote seemed to come as a shock to nearly everyone involved: The corporate lobbyists who considered their work almost done; the Euro open-source advocates who had already moved into post-"reform" damage control mode; and the U.S. media, which was already befuddled over odd sights like ordinary citizens joining protest marches over intellectual property reform. (Actually, I'm still puzzling over that one, too -- although I suspect there was a beer truck involved at some point in the process.)

The conventional wisdom holds that this time, the patent-grab effort has really, truly taken its last wheezy breath, after what seems like one tiresome revival after another over the past 18 months. What's more, the triumph of common sense on one side of the Atlantic could eventually jump The Pond, fueling efforts to reform a U.S. patent system that is so badly screwed up that even its chief beneficiaries are asking Congress to skip afternoon nap time in order to work on fixing it.

Just to make sure, though, I recommend rounding up a torch-wielding mob, some wooden stakes, a few pistol clips loaded with silver bullets, just to be sure this monster never again darkens Europe's doors.

And maybe send another beer truck along. Torch-wielding mobs do get thirsty.

Matt McKenzie
Editor, Linux Pipeline
 
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