A PSA from the Heart of America

Dondrei

Diabloii.Net Member
You'd also be surprised how many pronounciations people come up with for Albany.
How on earth can they do that? It looks like there's only one way to pronounce it to me.

Although that problem pales in comparison with how few actually know it is the capital of NY. I swear the next person who tells me completely seriously that NYC is the capital is getting punched in the throat.
I thought it was NYC... but I have an excuse I suppose.



 

Cannon Fodder

Diabloii.Net Member
Carthage -> Tunis
Ann's Arbor -> Ann Arbor (or something similar to that...)

Though I get your point really, I felt like being a jerk :)

Istanbul was Constantinople
Now it's Istanbul, not Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Constantinople
Now it's Turkish delight on a moonlit night

Every gal in Constantinople
Lives in Istanbul, not Constantinople
So if you've a date in Constantinople
She'll be waiting in Istanbul

Even old New York was once New Amsterdam
Why they changed it I can't say
People just liked it better that way

So take me back to Constantinople
No, you can't go back to Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Constantinople
Why did Constantinople get the works
That's nobody's business but the Turks

Istanbul (Istanbul)
Istanbul (Istanbul)

Even old New York was once New Amsterdam
Why they changed it I can't say
People just liked it better that way

Istanbul was Constantinople
Now it's Istanbul, not Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Constantinople
Why did Constantinople get the works
That's nobody's business but the Turks

So take me back to Constantinople
No, you can't go back to Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Constantinople
Why did Constantinople get the works
That's nobody's business but the Turks



 

Cannon Fodder

Diabloii.Net Member
How on earth can they do that? It looks like there's only one way to pronounce it to me.
Well for one thing people who are actually from the city tend to soften the L to more of a W (awbany), though it's not really too noticeable. The most annoying way people usually mess it up is saying the "ban" as if it were "bane". Then to add to that they will sometimes say the "Al" as if it were the name "Al" and not as if it were the word "All". I've also heard each of the syllables stressed, and a few completely off the wall ones I can't remember, but which I'll chalk up to purely individual stupidity. But yea, it doesn't exactly look like a hard word to pronounce.



I thought it was NYC... but I have an excuse I suppose.
*Punches Donny in the throat*

What can I say, I'm a man of my word.



 

EliManning

Diabloii.Net Member
A lot of people can't say stuff, that's just how America works. Next time you're in Kentucky ask 20 or so people how to get to Louisville just for laughs. You probably won't hear the same pronunciation twice.

If it makes you feel better I like to play a game where I ask someone who says Missoura how they say "missourian." They can't respond without looking ridiculous in one direction or the other.
 

AeroJonesy

Diabloii.Net Member
Heh. I was just going to mention Louisville. Pronounce it like Lewisville and the entire state will laugh at you. Pronounce it like Louieville and most of the state will still be laughing. Loovull is about as close as I can come writing it out.
 

Dondrei

Diabloii.Net Member
Well for one thing people who are actually from the city tend to soften the L to more of a W (awbany), though it's not really too noticeable. The most annoying way people usually mess it up is saying the "ban" as if it were "bane". Then to add to that they will sometimes say the "Al" as if it were the name "Al" and not as if it were the word "All". I've also heard each of the syllables stressed, and a few completely off the wall ones I can't remember, but which I'll chalk up to purely individual stupidity. But yea, it doesn't exactly look like a hard word to pronounce.
Oh right, I forgot you Americans elongate vowels sometimes for no apparent reason (there must be some sort of method you have, I don't know it though). I would've thought it was "AL-bah-nee", like the name "Al".

Istanbul was Constantinople
Now it's Istanbul, not Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Constantinople
Now it's Turkish delight on a moonlit night

Every gal in Constantinople
Lives in Istanbul, not Constantinople
So if you've a date in Constantinople
She'll be waiting in Istanbul

Even old New York was once New Amsterdam
Why they changed it I can't say
People just liked it better that way

So take me back to Constantinople
No, you can't go back to Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Constantinople
Why did Constantinople get the works
That's nobody's business but the Turks

Istanbul (Istanbul)
Istanbul (Istanbul)

Even old New York was once New Amsterdam
Why they changed it I can't say
People just liked it better that way

Istanbul was Constantinople
Now it's Istanbul, not Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Constantinople
Why did Constantinople get the works
That's nobody's business but the Turks

So take me back to Constantinople
No, you can't go back to Constantinople
Been a long time gone, Constantinople
Why did Constantinople get the works
That's nobody's business but the Turks
Bring back Byzantium, that was a way better name.



 

Cannon Fodder

Diabloii.Net Member
Oh right, I forgot you Americans elongate vowels sometimes for no apparent reason (there must be some sort of method you have, I don't know it though). I would've thought it was "AL-bah-nee", like the name "Al".

As long as you get the "bah-nee" part I'm happy. And I'm not sure it's a system so much as it is somebody messed it up one day and enough people liked it that it stuck. That seems to be the way English works in general anyways. Whenever I hear rules like "I before E, except after C" they strike me as completely backwards engineered. I feel like the rules are made to fit the language, and the language is never made to fit the rules.



 

Dondrei

Diabloii.Net Member
As long as you get the "bah-nee" part I'm happy. And I'm not sure it's a system so much as it is somebody messed it up one day and enough people liked it that it stuck. That seems to be the way English works in general anyways. Whenever I hear rules like "I before E, except after C" they strike me as completely backwards engineered. I feel like the rules are made to fit the language, and the language is never made to fit the rules.
Yeah, I agree with all that. And I was thinking the other day about how stupid the "I before E" thing is, I can think of heaps of exceptions both the rule and to the modifying "except when pronounced as in neighbour and weigh".



 

Bortaz

Banned
The "Missoura" pronunciation is an old-fashioned thing. You rarely hear anyone use it now, but it used to be used widely by old people. My dad calls it that, and calls Colorado "call a ray do" or "call uh rotta" for some damn reason. Young people, of course, care about pronouncing it right.
 

Merick

Diabloii.Net Member
Yeah, I heard Candi Crowley on CNN say it like that and I thought "that sounds horrible".
 

Bortaz

Banned
Ugh, Candi Crowley has to be the weirdest, ugliest, crappiest reporter ever. I can't stand that wench.
 

Merick

Diabloii.Net Member
Ugh, Candi Crowley has to be the weirdest, ugliest, crappiest reporter ever. I can't stand that wench.
Yeah, and it can't be easy to be overweight and named "Candy*"

*I looked it up, that's how you spell it.



 

maccool

Diabloii.Net Member
IThe last syllable in "Oregon" does not sound like "gone," by the way. I used to have a T-shirt that told the world ORYGUN in no uncertain terms.
You know, for years I had thought ye olde ex had taken my ORYGUN shirt in 'the breakup'. Now I know it was you. Lousy, thieving Durf. Unless they made more than one of those shirts.

Man, that was a sweet shirt. The ex, not so much.



 

caddad

Diabloii.Net Member
I'm proud to say I had no problems adjusting to the pronunciation of Oregon.

Rhododendron on the other hand still gets me weird looks 'round these parts.

-D2netDad
 
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