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a little cpu help plz

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by ASTRALdragon, Feb 7, 2004.

  1. ASTRALdragon

    ASTRALdragon IncGamers Member

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    a little cpu help plz

    do you guys hve any links to websites that have detailed instructions on how to build a computer (illustrations would be a big help)? i just need a guide to see me through my first build. i more or less know what to do but having a guide ready would be more comforting to me. 2nd question) is it possible to connect 2 hard drives to 1 computer that does not support RAID to transfer data? i do not feel like backing up 40-ish GBs on my old hard drive just to move it to my new 120 GB hard drive. last question) how do you know if your mobo is fried? i hope it doesn't come to this because i have the little anti-static wristband but you never know... thank you everyone in advance. :)

    EDIT for guspasho: actually the mobo frying thing is for my bro's pc. i transferred it to another tower for him and i connected everything in its place except for the case connectors (i.e. power led, reset sw, hdd led, etc.). i'm pretty sure i put those in the right place but when i try to power on the pc it doesn't respond. i try to mix and match the connectors but nothing seems to make it work. i asked him for the instructions manual but he lost it and it's not exactly one of the new mobos like mine where everything is pretty much self-explanatory on the mobo itself. all i know about it is that it supports his 1.0 GHz AMD Athlon cpu and has built in sound and like 3 USBs. otherwise i have no idea what make or model it is because i can't find a name or number on it (there's a bar code but i doubt that says anything useful to me). the websites might help me see what and where i should put those connectors too.
     
  2. guspasho

    guspasho IncGamers Member

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    Try Tom's Hardware, Ars Technica, HardOCP, and maybe also AnandTech. Do some searches there, read what relevant guides you can find, and sign up at and use what forums are available.

    You don't need RAID to connect two hard drives. Your IDE cable will have two connectors for IDE devices, and your motherboard should have two IDE ports for cables. Just plug a drive into one of those cables, make sure you have the jumper how you want it and in accord with where on the IDE cable the drive is, and you're all set up. From there, just watch the boot process to make sure your computer recognizes the new drive.

    Building a computer is easy. Explaining it is hard when one doesn't know what information you need.

    What makes you think your motherboard is fried?
     
  3. cleanupguy

    cleanupguy IncGamers Member

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    All you really need is the instructional manual for your motherboard. It basically explains to you what components to go where basically. There is nothing at all to putting together your computer. If you can get past your fear about it, then you can certainly make one!
    It is possible to connect 2 hard drives to 1 computer. Each mother board in general permits you to connect 4 drives. 2 drives to primary IDE and 2 drives to secondary IDE. As long as you put the jumper setting on your hard drive correctly, you shouldn't have any problem. I would recommend putting your 120-gig hard drive as primary and 40-gig hard drive as secondary. Make sure to set 120-gig hard drive as "master" and your 40-gig hard drive as "slave." By using a 2-drive supported IDE cable (this cable usually comes with a brand new purchase of motherboard or you can buy one for $5.00.), you should connect these two hard drives to primary IDE. Also, it is better to connect 2 hard drives to the same IDE slot because it gives you faster data transfer rate. By the way, master drive goes farthest point away from the IDE slot and slave drive goes in the middle on the IDE cable. Also, slave connector is always closer to master connector than the IDE connection point. I would also recommend partitioning your 120-gig drive to smaller chunks. This way you can manage your drives better and improve performance.

    You really can't tell unless you try the mother board with another set up.

    You have to connect case connectors as well. Otherwise, your computer simply will not work. For example, you need to put in at least the POWER LED. In terms of what connectors go where, you will need the manual. Without the manual, unless the motherboard has specified this on the board itself, you won't be able to get this going. Try to look at where the case connectors go with flashlight. There might be tiny writing that goes something like "LED," "SPEAKER," "RESET," etc. You can always download manuals from the motherboard's manufacturer. The brand and model No. will be written somewhere on the motherboard. It might be on the back, but generally it is written on the front of the board. Also, if your brother's computer was purchased as a pre-made computer, you might be able to find out what brand motherboard it is by looking at the specs on the maker of the computer.

    I don't think your motherboard is fried if you didn't connect the case connectors. And even if you did, if they are not in the right places, then it still won't work. Good luck. :xsmile:

     
  4. Dark Matter

    Dark Matter IncGamers Member

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    If you know your brother's mobo you should be able to dl a PDF manual from the makers website.
     
  5. Underseer

    Underseer IncGamers Member

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    The one major frustration to building your own computer is the first time you put the components together.

    If you add a new part to an existing computer and the computer stops working, you have a pretty good idea which part doesn't work. If all your parts are new and the computer doesn't work, tracking down the bad part can be very frustrating. Statistically you have about a one in three chance of encountering at least one bad part per computer build. Cross your fingers!

    Also, I would like to point out that building your own is no longer cheaper than buying pre-made. The big computer companies now get such huge discounts buying in bulk that it's cheaper to buy from them. I still build my own mostly because I like to know exactly what parts are in my case instead of trusting that to someone else. There's also a certain sense of satisfaction from doing it yourself.

    About choosing parts: do not trust brands you don't recognize. Do your research. At the very minimum, verify that the manufacturer has a web site with drivers available for download. If possible, try to determine the frequency at which drivers are published. The others here furnished very good web sites for looking up reviews of various parts.

    I would like to add one more web site recommendation to the list:

    http://www.sharkyextreme.com/

    The main thing about Sharky's is that they regularly publish a "High end gaming PC buyer's guide" and a "Value gaming PC buyer's guide." You can find links to them on the list of links to the left.

    The buyer's guides basically consolidate all the parts reviews and gives recommendations of what parts to buy if you're building a computer. They have separate guides based on how much you're willing to spend. Their recommendations aren't always perfect, but pretty darned good and an excellent starting off point for someone looking to build a computer.

    Oh, and the previously mentioned sites have excellent articles covering computer building (particularly [H]ardOCP and Tom's Hardware). Do check them out.
     
  6. cleanupguy

    cleanupguy IncGamers Member

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    I'd second this. I've never bought no name brand for any parts of my computers or any other computers that I have put together. Of some 50+ computers that I have put together, I had 1 case of bad motherboard and 2 cases of bad memory. I think it's primarily because I do not trust no name brands or brands that I've never heard of.

    Also, despite what other people may say, I think Dell provides cheap computers that are very reliable without too much junk stuff clogging memory. Other brands have too many junk stuff that preload and clog up your memory.

     
  7. Underseer

    Underseer IncGamers Member

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    Sorry to repeat myself, but I've learned my lesson the hard way with manufacturers that have no tech support of any kind and indeed, no way to discern the address or phone number of their business. Such companies never have driver updates available. All you get is what's in the box.

    As long as we're talking about hard-learned lessons, do not skimp on the CD-ROM or DVD-ROM. The resulting pain just isn't worth the small dollar savings. I would like to say I learned that lesson after only one mistake, I really, really would. :)
     
  8. asdf

    asdf IncGamers Member

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    seriously, how to build a computer:
    1. buy case. a mid-tower or larger
    2. buy power supply.
    3. buy motherboard and cpu. just do a little research as to which one you want. most cpu's include a heatsink.
    4. buy ram
    5. buy video card
    6. buy hard drive
    7. buy optical drive

    now for the next step

    8. plug everything in where they look like they fit.

    most motherboards nowadays will auto-detect the hardware and stuff. go into the bios, boot from cd-rom, install your os.

    if any problems occur... time to open the instruction manuals. and as said above, do not buy generic/no-name brands. they absolutely suck to the highest degree, always. if you're new to manufacturer names just read reviews on tom's hardware and look for brand names they give high points to and stuff.
     

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