A little biochem/metabolism question

zodiac66

Diabloii.Net Member
A little biochem/metabolism question

I am only asking here since my prof is a computer putz and had to cancel class twice now due to her ineptitude with the AV equipment.

Ok..I understand what ATP is. I am getting confused where NADH comes in. I know it is a catalyst for ATP..the spark plug so to speak. It is an enzyme derived from what we eat. I am having difficulty understanding the substrate-level phosphorylation with regards to the enzyme relating to the production of energy.

Can anyone provide me with a "dummy" website that is not all that dumb?

As I said, I am trying to learn this on my own.
 

zodiac66

Diabloii.Net Member
Yes I have. It was not clear to me from there how the process works.

I realize for the exams..I am delving deeper than I need to. I am the sort of person who has to understand the whole process before understanding the bits.

I could be completely wrong here..but in my major, I would equate the time of death of a body to the amount of ATP in the cells.
 

Rius666

Diabloii.Net Member
NAD+ is basically the an electron transporter. During the process of glycolysis and Citric acid cycle, electrons are released. NAD+ plus essentially binds these electrons to be become NADH (same concept works for FAD+ which can bind two electrons due to the inconsistent 2:1 electron nature in ATP generation, thus becoming FADH2).

The NADH transports these electrons to the electron transport chain and dumps them off there. Electrons then proceed through the three different membrane complexes in the ETC and each time their transfer energy is used to generate a proton gradient across the inner membrane of the mitochondria.

Since there is a H+ gradient (meaning more H+ on one side than the other) then the H+ will need to proceed down their concentration gradient (due to concentration flowing from higher to lower). The H+ flow back into the inner portion via ATP Synthase, a three part enzyme that binds 2 electrons for each 2.5 rotations (I think it's 2.5, I'm not sure). Basically it binds H+ to generate ATP from ADP.

I realize this might be confusing so I'll see if I can find a video for it.

EDIT: These pictures/sites might help. I'm still looking for the video.


http://employees.csbsju.edu/hjakubowski/classes/ch331/oxphos/catabolismoverview.gif

http://www.gwu.edu/~mpb/oxidativephos.htm

http://tidepool.st.usm.edu/pix/resp.gif
 

zodiac66

Diabloii.Net Member
As I got to thinking..this energy is run with glucose. I wonder, on a cellular level, how healthy an Atkins type of diet is. How does this process work with just lipids and proteins?
 

Rius666

Diabloii.Net Member
zodiac66 said:
As I got to thinking..this energy is run with glucose. I wonder, on a cellular level, how healthy an Atkins type of diet is. How does this process work with just lipids and proteins?
I was never a fan of the Atkin's diet. How can you completely cut out an integral portion of your diet in the form of carbs are still remain "healthy"? But there are other forms of metabolism that metabolizes fats (which are basically lipids that can be broken down via hydrolysis, this is used more of as a short term energy source). Proteins can also be metabolized.
 
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