3D imaging programs

VampiroXIII

Diabloii.Net Member
3D imaging programs

Does anyone know of a good one that won't break the bank? The only 2 good ones that I'm aware of are Maya and 3DS Max from Autodesk, but at $2000 and $3500, respectively, from Autodesk, I don't think so. I'm not doing anything huge, just something to make some basic 3D characters and worlds I can use to practice video game programming.
 

PlagueBearer

Diabloii.Net Member
Does anyone know of a good one that won't break the bank? The only 2 good ones that I'm aware of are Maya and 3DS Max from Autodesk, but at $2000 and $3500, respectively, from Autodesk, I don't think so. I'm not doing anything huge, just something to make some basic 3D characters and worlds I can use to practice video game programming.
If you want to practice making games, you need to learn Max, there's no way around it. You can find it "for free" with some half decent finding skills.



 

caddad

Diabloii.Net Member
I disagree with that.

3Dstudio might be the 'best' choice, but it is far from the only choice especially if he is dedicated to making his own game.

Learning 3Dstudio may be important to mainstream game production, but making a good game is not software dependant and most of the time they won't hire you for your ability to use the software, hell lots of people can "use" software. They will hire you for what comes with the user, especially in the game industry.

Learning to model and animate in a believable way does not come with the price tag on the software you use.

If you 'get' it and are good at it, the software you use will become an extension of you, not the reason you are good.

I have ~15,000 hours experience in ~20-25 CAD and design//animation software packages. Each one is different and better//worse at things than the others but ultimately I drive them and make them work for me, which would be the only advice I could give you if you are starting out.

Good luck.

-D2netDad
 

Dondrei

Diabloii.Net Member
Interesting stuff. So Blender is built on Python? I might check it out for making cutscenes or whatever for that game I'm building. Well, in a million years when I've gotten the gameplay basics working anyway.
 

PlagueBearer

Diabloii.Net Member
I disagree with that.

3Dstudio might be the 'best' choice, but it is far from the only choice especially if he is dedicated to making his own game.

Learning 3Dstudio may be important to mainstream game production, but making a good game is not software dependant and most of the time they won't hire you for your ability to use the software, hell lots of people can "use" software. They will hire you for what comes with the user, especially in the game industry.

Learning to model and animate in a believable way does not come with the price tag on the software you use.

If you 'get' it and are good at it, the software you use will become an extension of you, not the reason you are good.

I have ~15,000 hours experience in ~20-25 CAD and design//animation software packages. Each one is different and better//worse at things than the others but ultimately I drive them and make them work for me, which would be the only advice I could give you if you are starting out.

Good luck.

-D2netDad
Fair enough: if your goal is to make your own game from your own home from the ground up then sure, use whatever you want. If you want to make a career out of it you need to learn what the industry uses, which is almost always some version of Max, though Maya is gaining some ground and I personally prefer XSI.



 

Peregrine

Diabloii.Net Member
Just a few things to say here:

1) Blender is what you're looking for. It can do most of what the professional stuff can. And more importantly, everything you need right now... you won't need to worry about any missing features until you get a lot more experience. Especialy if you're aiming at game development, who cares if its photo-real rendering abilities aren't quite as good as the $3000 programs, or whatever. You're more likely to run into limits with your game engine than with blender. And of course you just can't beat a price of free, if money is an issue.

2) Most of these programs have huge student discounts, bringing the price down to $500 or so. So that's something to keep in mind, if you can show a school ID, you can get a full version of the software for the price of a couple textbooks.

3) Talking about which program is an absolute "best" is just silly... any of the major professional ones are perfectly capable of doing whatever you want them to. The only difference is personal preference on which one suits your personal work style better, or which very specific features you need. And once you learn to use one program at a high level, you can easily just switch to another if a job and model formats demand it.
 
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