11 November

maccool

Diabloii.Net Member
11 November

In Flanders Fields - Lt. Col. John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved, and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.


Someone usually posts this poem here on Rememberance/Veterans Day. Might as well be me. Thanks to all past, present and future veterans.
 

Saint Anger

Diabloii.Net Member
Even though I've seen and read it often, it still moves me as if it was the first time. My everlasting gratitude to those who have laid so costly a sacrafice upon the altar of freedom. May their legacy never be forgotten.

St. Anger
 

Ariadne

Diabloii.Net Member
Excuse my ignorance but can someone, in short, tell me what is being remembered on the 11th of November? And how it got related to people wearing poppy badges?
 

Ariadne

Diabloii.Net Member
A very nice poem. Thank you for posting it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veterans_Day
Thank you, that was interesting, though I generally dislike wikipedia.
Where do the poppies come in, if I may ask?

I hate to say it, but in my country, there's no such thing as remembering those who fought in the war, on 11th November. We either have carnival season starting (in the south) or children singing st Maarten songs from door to door (in the west)



 

Carino

Diabloii.Net Member
Thank you, that was interesting, though I generally dislike wikipedia.
Where do the poppies come in, if I may ask?
From Wikipedia,

The Poppies

The poppy's significance to Remembrance Day is a result of Canadian military physician John McCrae's poem In Flanders Fields. The poppy emblem was chosen because of the poppies that bloomed across some of the worst battlefields of Flanders in World War I, their red colour an appropriate symbol for the bloodshed of trench warfare. A Frenchwoman by the name of Madame E. Guérin introduced the widely used artificial poppies given out today. Some people choose to wear white poppies, which emphasises a desire for peaceful alternatives to military action. The sale of red poppies raises funds to help ex-servicemen - the sale of white poppies does not, but does support peace work and education. Until 1996, poppies were made by disabled veterans in Canada, but they have since been made by a private contractor.

In England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland the poppies are the flat Earl Haig variety with a leaf, and in Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Scotland the poppies are curled at the petals with no leaf.

In Sri Lanka in the inter-war years, there were rival sales of yellow Suriya (portia tree) flowers by the Suriya-Mal Movement on Remembrance Day, since funds from poppy sales were not used for Sri Lankan ex-service personnel but were repatriated to Britain. However, nowadays poppy sales are used for indigenous ex-service personnel



 

Z-Suijin

Diabloii.Net Member
Thank you for posting the poem it is very nice of you.

Where do the poppies come in, if I may ask?

I hate to say it, but in my country, there's no such thing as remembering those who fought in the war, on 11th November. We either have carnival season starting (in the south) or children singing st Maarten songs from door to door (in the west)
Here is a brief explanation for the poppies



 

Dondrei

Diabloii.Net Member
I think our Remembrance Day is on this same day, there was a moment's silence on TV yesterday.

Although I have to say, of all the bazillions of poems in the world, I like about two.
 

maccool

Diabloii.Net Member
Vivi said:
We either have carnival season starting (in the south) or children singing st Maarten songs from door to door (in the west)
It's kinda weird that the feast of St. Martin (of Tours) occurs on the same day, given that he became a monk after a life of soldiering. If I were less cynical and a better Catholic, I'd say there was a reason.

The reason I posted the poem and the reason that others have posted the poem before me is to recognize and remember those who have served. That's all.
 

Ariadne

Diabloii.Net Member
It's kinda weird that the feast of St. Martin (of Tours) occurs on the same day, given that he became a monk after a life of soldiering. If I were less cynical and a better Catholic, I'd say there was a reason.

The reason I posted the poem and the reason that others have posted the poem before me is to recognize and remember those who have served. That's all.
I merely mentioned that because there's no sign of rememberance day in this country. After having read the explanation I at least now know why - if it's related to WW I, our country was said to be neutral during it.
But you're right, it's odd. And it's best to be a cynical Catholic anyways.



 

Ariadne

Diabloii.Net Member
From Wikipedia,

The Poppies

The poppy's significance to Remembrance Day is a result of Canadian military physician John McCrae's poem In Flanders Fields. The poppy emblem was chosen because of the poppies that bloomed across some of the worst battlefields of Flanders in World War I, their red colour an appropriate symbol for the bloodshed of trench warfare. A Frenchwoman by the name of Madame E. Guérin introduced the widely used artificial poppies given out today. Some people choose to wear white poppies, which emphasises a desire for peaceful alternatives to military action. The sale of red poppies raises funds to help ex-servicemen - the sale of white poppies does not, but does support peace work and education. Until 1996, poppies were made by disabled veterans in Canada, but they have since been made by a private contractor.

In England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland the poppies are the flat Earl Haig variety with a leaf, and in Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Scotland the poppies are curled at the petals with no leaf.

In Sri Lanka in the inter-war years, there were rival sales of yellow Suriya (portia tree) flowers by the Suriya-Mal Movement on Remembrance Day, since funds from poppy sales were not used for Sri Lankan ex-service personnel but were repatriated to Britain. However, nowadays poppy sales are used for indigenous ex-service personnel

Makes sense, thank you.



 
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