Use Diablo 3 Hacks, Get Hacked


The AVG antivirus maker posted a press release warning about hacks in game hacks, and since their PR spoke specifically about Diablo 3 hacks, here’s a quote:

In a quick test, AVG’s researchers searched FileCrop for a Diablo 3 hack, one of the most popular ‘swords and sorcery’ games on the market. The FileCrop search result listed more than 40 hacks, all temptingly titled to encourage users looking for the greatest in-game rewards and benefits. For the biggest titles, such as World of Warcraft or Minecraft, a similar FileCrop search reveals hundreds of hacks.

At random, the team selected and downloaded a file called ‘Diablo 3 Item generator and gold hack.zip’. After downloading and unpacking the file, the team’s installed AVG Internet Security software immediately detected malicious code in the hack itself.

What damage can they do?

Left to do its dirty work, this malicious code would attempt to decrypt the saved website passwords stored in the machine’s web browser keypass. Any sensitive information it found would then be sent back to the attacker via email.

However, it could also mean you lose your game account altogether: attackers can profit from the theft by trading the accounts online in exchange for cash. A registered user account could cost hundreds of dollars and hours of gameplay to replace, while in-game purchases (power-ups, weapons, equipment, etc.) may be lost or sold before the user has a chance to contact the game developer and reclaim their hacked account. This would be in addition to the more common objective of malware – stealing bank account details, hacking email accounts or accessing social networks.

This is the sort of thing Blizzard warns about all the time, so let a computer security firm add weight to the argument. Or do would-be cheaters deserve to be punished and hacked for their efforts, and thus warnings are misguided?

Tagged As: | Categories: Diablo 3 Hacks

Comments

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  1. Anyone that believes there is an item generator for an online-only game is an idiot.

  2. They’d pay the stupid tax.

    Obviously though, the actual “hacker” in this case should be found and punished,. but at the same time, any “would be” hacker who’s even searching for this kind of stuff needs to get their account blocked.

    Leaving this stuff alone currently does help get rid of the would be hackers,. but the “big guys” that are spreading this stuff are going home-free right now.
    Since the stuff mails passwords – perhaps a not quite so friendly email to their provider could help annoy them somewhat.

  3. I’ll defer to grumpy cat on this one

  4. there is a thing called an authenticator for a reason.

  5. Lol its kind of poetic, people looking to win by cheating losing their accounts altogether. I think thats awesome.

  6. great , its there own fault they get hacked !!

  7. Lol, swords and sorcery game, that is a much better category definition for D3 than action RPG 🙂

  8. The fact that authenticators are even needed for this game proves the whole argument for online only game-play as a security feature completely and utterly false!

    Within one month of release I had friends who play Diablo 3 getting hacked via Chinese hackers. The same crew running the bot patrol. Stupid.

    I finally got this same person to play online with me last weekend, I had to beg and plead. They have not logged in since.

    All online only did was to put me, my friends, and everybody else in the same online boat as the hackers and bots.

    The most secure gaming environment I have ever had or ever will have was a decade of offline single player Diablo 2 LOD. No bots, hacks or spammers required.

    My diablo 2 characters are backed up and can live on for decades more, how long will the diablo 3 servers stay up? Every single character, item, and piece of gold on blizzards servers has a shelf life…

    If the hackers don’t get you, time will. Online only for the win!

    • Oh God… You really don’t know what are you talking about…

      • He really does, harmundo… what you don´t really know, is how outstandingly awesome the whole playing enviroment was (and most probably still is and always will be) in the incgamers Single Player Forum!

        We have always held MUCH higher antics and requirements of honor than many many players playing on Battle.net (and this is especially true for LoD where pretty much all the high items and runes were knowingly duped and hacket, though nobody minded since it was the norm).

        We could actually play HC where dying meant YOU screwed up and deserved to die, and not that a lagspike held your character in place while waiting to DC.

        We had ATMA, which gave us endless stashing options, thus giving us that fanatsic feeling of working on and eventually even completing a self found grail og all uniques and sets in the game.

        Man, that game really had some outstanding systems, and I have to admit I liked it even better before 1.13 and the freespecs came along.

        Either way, online only was never meant to give us, players constant patch updates, a hack and bot free requirement and a great platform to communicate with others. All it did was ruin the HC aspect of the game for me and many others, as well as combined with the AH, make the item hunt feel rather pointless.

        Still love D3, but it´s unfortunately not half the game D2 was, or what D3 should have been,

  9. As for the topic, I am sorry for being harsh, but if you are dumb enough to fall for that kind of stuff in 2013 after what… over 20 years of being on the internet, then you probably deserve to be hacked and get all your stuff stolen and banned.

    I mean, come on! Must be just as smart as buying that penis enlargement cure online, or sending your bank account details to that rich African king in order for him to deposit his fortune there for you.

    Jesus…

    • There are people playing D3 who have not been on the Intertubes the last 20 years…
      (•_•)( •_•)>??-?(??_?)
      …e.g. Blizzards target audience.

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