David Brevik reveals his new game - Diabloii.Net

David Brevik Reveals his New Game It Lurks Below


Back in 2015 David Brevik left the now-closed Gazillion and Marvel Hereos and decided to go it alone with his own one-man studio Graybeard Games. Today he revealed what he’s been working on and it’s called It Lurks Below.

Diablo players will have been hoping for some new ARPG from the Diablo creator but this time it’s something different. David is creating a 2D sandbox RPG which has been influenced by games such as Terraria and Minecraft which also pulls on his APRG game mechanic skills.

“Though I certainly had creative influence as CEO of Gazillion, I feel like I’m finally right back where I belong—actually getting my hands dirty and creating great games,” says Brevik. “It’s humbling going from large teams making content based on huge properties like Marvel to a one-man team with a brand new idea no one has heard of yet—but I’m loving every minute of the process. It’s all very exciting…and a little bit scary, too. I’ve always been a huge proponent of community involvement in game creation, and I heartily welcome all feedback from players and Twitch-stream viewers—anything that can make It Lurks Below the best it can possibly be.”

David will be showcasing the game this weekend on Twitch and you can tune in at the following times.

  • Friday, Feb. 2: 9 p.m. – 11 p.m. PST
  • Saturday, Feb. 3: 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. PST
  • Sunday, Feb. 4 (it’s the biggest game to watch of the day!): 10 a.m. – Noon PST
  • Monday, Feb. 5: Noon – 2 p.m. PST

Thanks PC Invasion.

Tagged As: | Categories: Other Games

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  1. With that kind of graphics it doesn’t matter if the gameplay is good or not, blocky/pixelated retro-vision(tm) is a no-go for me. In short, I really hate this stupid retro-revival thing.

    For those of us who were alive in the 80s, I recall that the whole idea in computer/console graphics development was to go forward, to make graphics life-like. Just like special effects in movies. Nowadays, going backwards seems to be a trend in culture and society: LPs, cassetes, synthpop, blocky graphics, politics, superstition over science…

    • Problem is that graphics have become the main factor for a lot of games out there, and a growing demographic is unhappy about this trend. The same is true for the movie industry, movies are shiny with over-the-top CGI but often have terrible story, characters, acting, directing, cinematography etc.

      IMO Games are like art and Graphics are something like a “painting style”. There is no Right or Wrong or Good or Bad if you ask me. Its all highly subjective just as the taste for a specific art style.

      The reason why there is a big “retro” movement, far beyond gaming, is fairly complex. In terms of “Games”, before “Graphics” became the main aspect of games, it was necessary to build sometimes complex, mentally engaging and stimulating content that would last. “The best games of all time” were not resting on graphics, but on sound, music, tone, depth, replayability, balance, and many other factors. Graphics should be just one factor of many.

      Imo the following things are far more important than TOP-END-Graphics:

      – Gameplay
      – Replayability
      – Tone and Setting
      – Music and Sound
      – Mentally engaging content
      – originality
      – etc

      I think if all those things (and more) are developed and designed well, then adequate graphics just make the game more appealing to potential customers. Its like people on the street, there are good looking and subjectively attractive people out there and we look because the sight stimulates and attracts us. But its character, mentality, intellect, humor and other factors that truly spin our wheels in the end.

      • I totally agree with this. Gameplay trumps appearance any day.

        I held off on purchasing Terraria for a year because of it’s graphics, but then decided to purchase it on a whim during a Christmas sale after hearing how popular it was. The 2.0 version had just been released.

        What has resulted is the discovery of a game which I’ve put almost as many hours into as I have played Diablo II. It’s one of my most beloved games.

      • Pixelated graphics were not a “painting style”. It was the only style. Designers and artists imagined what it could be, but were forced to use low res sprites and limited color palettes.

        The artists of today finally have the freedom to choose any style they want– and they intentionally choose a bogus 30 year old technical limitation and call it “art”. It’s insulting to those of us who were on the front lines of game development in the 1980s.

      • “IMO Games are like art and Graphics are something like a “painting style”.”

        That was one good analogy, and one I completely agree with. But retro graphics is just not my cup of tea. Not in this year and age or on a new game. If I want retro, I just dig one of my old PC games collection for the real deal.

        As for the other points you make, I agree that the other game elements like gameplay/story/ambiance/etc are very important, and I can tolerate graphics that are not top-end, as you say. I like the style of games like “Alto’s Adventure”, for example, which are simple yet beautiful in my opinion.

        But 8-bit blocky graphics ala Minecraft, no thanks. These kind of graphics only distract from the other qualities of the game.

    • “retro-revival thing” … “going backwards seems to be a trend”

      that has nothing to do with it

      the reason the graphics look bad is bercause he did the entire thing himself and he’s not a graphics person

      • What a lame excuse. He had over two years and more than enough money to hire help. He could’ve learned proper graphics techniques in that time.

        Thousands of less accomplished developers do it every day. He intentionally chose to do it this way.

        • “He had over two years and more than enough money to hire help”

          he’s been working on the game one year and 2 months — he’s done all the programming, all the art, all the music, all the design himself — and the game totally self-financed — no investors, no kickstarter

          yes, he intentionally chose to do it this way instead of spending thousands of dollars on an artists — DUH

  2. Problem is that graphics have become the main factor for a lot of games out there, and a growing demographic is unhappy about this trend. The same is true for the movie industry, movies are shiny with over-the-top CGI but often have terrible story, characters, acting, directing, cinematography etc.

  3. IMO Games are like art and Graphics are something like a “painting style”. There is no Right or Wrong or Good or Bad if you ask me. Its all highly subjective just as the taste for a specific art style.

  4. The reason why there is a big “retro” movement, far beyond gaming, is fairly complex.

  5. In terms of “Games”, before “Graphics” became the main aspect of games, it was necessary to build sometimes complex, mentally engaging and stimulating content that would last.

  6. “The best games of all time” were not resting on graphics, but on sound, music, tone, depth, replayability, balance, and many other factors. Graphics should be just one factor of many.

  7. Imo the following things are far more important than TOP-END-Graphics:

    – Gameplay
    – Replayability
    – Tone and Setting
    – Music and Sound
    – Mentally engaging content
    – originality
    – etc

  8. I think if all those things (and more) are developed and designed well

  9. adequate graphics just make the game more appealing to potential customers.

  10. Wow, watching those bots go is crazy. I wonder what their purpose is on a Diablo news site? Maybe it is testing some kind of algorithm to see what people will respond to the most out of Commanders chopped up post? I’d then guess that it would try to sell you stuff if you engage with it?

    Might need to introduce a proper captcha at some point Rush :/

    • “Maybe it is testing some kind of algorithm”
      Rise of the machines, mark my words…

      Is it just me that finds the idea of a bot clicking the “I am not a robot” button?

  11. Well, I was pretty intrigued seeing Brevik’s name attached to a new project, but it’s a complete no go for me with the retro thing.
    I don’t have a 100GB video card with 8K liquid cooled blah blah but I have a decent card and want games to look good. I don’t necessarily need games to make the lights in my office dim from power drain but to purposely make them look bad (which this does to me) I don’t get the appeal.

  12. I played this before when it was called Terr…umm…Starb….ummm…Minecr…wait…Why would we play this one?

  13. I feel like that guy is totally out of touch with the current market… A bit like Garriott and his new “ultima online” style game that’s totally going to crash and burn…

    I mean honestly, in recent years we’ve had Terraria, which has so much fucking content in it now it boggles the mind, and we’ve had Starbound, which is inspired by Terraria but goes in a more RPG/storytelling/questing route and does it quite well. Why on earth would ANYONE now be interested in a new game that does exactly these things? AND it’s pixelart as well?!?! Maybe if he’d gone for a 2d terraria style rpg game with very different and interesting graphics, maybe some physics related gameplay, then maybe, but no, this is going to be shit I’m afraid…

    **I accidentally posted this before as a reply to a bot, if any site admin can delete that post that would be great, otherwise just ignore it! :P**

    • David Brevik’s game is a personal project that he chose to do because he felt like it. This is what real game designers do when they find the time. “Game Designers” that don’t create games in their spare time are not real game designers. They are “game designers” out of opportunity or necessity, rather than passion. We all know if you don’t have a passion for something, then its better to stop what you’re doing and go find your passion somewhere else, because the things you will create without passion will be mediocre at best. (This is especially true for work that creates things for the broad audiences in this world, such as art, music, games etc)

      His game is not meant to be “the next big thing”. It’s just a personal one-man project where no one would tell him what to do or not to do. If it makes some cash then great, if not then “so what?” (and I am sure it will make some cash).

      These indie games are like books, they sell one by one and some are more popular than others. Sometimes games or books for sake of example, do not get “discovered” until years later and then experience a big boom and popularity.

      Games that allocated most of the budget for graphics are almost always junk, especially in the long term.

      • It appears he’s been working on this for a couple of years, so it’s not really a ‘spare time’ project. I expect that he is wanting to make money off this, so the relevance in the market place is important.

        I have no idea what their Condor’s sale to Blizzard was like, but given that they hadn’t published any games at that point, I don’t imagine it was a pay-day jackpot type of deal. If they managed to negotiate a percentage of sales then they could have done well for themselves, but I’m not sure that’s likely.

        Given Blizzard didn’t seem to particularly care when the ‘big 4’ left and set up Flagship studios, and that they were willing to do that in the first place, they may not have had any sort of enduring cashflow from Diablo.

        Which means that David Brevik and the others likely stumped up all of their own personal money as collateral when they started Flagship studios (I recall Bill Roper saying he was using his own money to pay salaries at one point), it is likely that David Brevik doesn’t have “f you money” and does actually need to sell games for a living.

        Like others, I think he might be missing the mark a bit here. It’d difficult to see what is going to set this game apart, and I think that although the art style is deliberately retro, it actually looks like crappy/bad retro art, rather than good stuff.

  14. At the risk of betraying one’s age:

    Anyone played oldie classic game “Sword of Fargoal” from the 1980’s?
    It’s still alive and well, with an iPhone/iPad App for Sword of Fargoal which is selling reasonably well.

    The PC-computer version of Sword of Fargoal is still very addictive, despite its (very) simple premise and challenges you to an (almost) impossible task of completing the game.
    ie: Go down to the deepest parts of the dungeon and return back with the Sword.

    This Sword of Fargoal game is very addictive even today, despite its pixel-like look, sorta like the “It Lurks Below” shown.

    In short, it’s the game premise and execution that makes a Classic game.
    Not its graphics candy.

  15. The idea that graphics aren’t important is a lie. Every classic game I can think used the machine they were designed on. Making graphics the most important factor is just a bad approach, sure. But rarely did a game have to give up graphics (is there even one game) to the point of going back two generations to get the gameplay and story they wanted.

    FFVII, didn’t use NES graphics, Diablo II wasn’t made to look like it was played on an Apple II, Super Mario Bros didn’t settle for Atari graphics. There is no reason why a decent game today can’t match the graphics of at least a PS2.

    • Unless it’s done that way on purpose maybe? It’s called nostalgia.

    • This. Exactly. Never before games were designed with past generations’ graphics in mind. Games age, graphics age, and in some years from now even nowadays games will become “retro” or have “dated graphics”. For a not-so-old example, remember Doom 3 from 2004? I remember that no videocard from that era could run the game at ultra settings, but one or two years later it was achievable. Last year we had the most recent Doom game released, and its graphics were way better, with 4k support and even VR.

      And yet in 2018 some devs purposedly make their games retro-looking, and my gut says that they do this just to capitalize in some kind of nostalgia instead of a performance/gameplay reason. That’s why this whole retro-thing seems fake/forced or simply too stupid to me. As if retro-looking games ran faster compared to others.

      The indie game scene reminds me of the shovelware CD-ROMs of the 90’s, discs that contained thousands of freeware games, most of them ugly-looking games or with shallow/short gameplay. There were exceptions, of course. But the vast majority were just fodder. Who remembers them now? Only games collectors on mobygames.com. The difference is that you can find them on estores right next to AAA titles on platforms like steam.

      I would say that if you want to play good retro-looking good games: browse mobygames.com for the best games of yesteryear, then head to ebay or some place else, install dosbox, and emulator or a virtual machine on you computer, install the game and enjoy the real thing.

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